Farfel Notebook 02: Leaves 065-134

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Jan. 78 (75) $25.00 Duschnes, N.Y. Hymnarium. Penitential Psalms for Cistercian Order. (Germany) Middle Europe, 13th C. [inserted] late 14 [end inserted] Written in black + red on vellum page 8 1/2 X 6" in heavy gothic letters. Black notes on a 5 [inserted] line [end inserted] stave with large initials in red + blue. (Gothic notation - the latest of the distinctive neumatic styles - originated in the 14th C. - predominating sign [illegible] Serifs, generally regarded as a mark of deterioration of a script Extensive flourishes + excessive serifs betray its lateness hardly a word that does not show flourishes of which script of the more vigorus 13th C was free. yn9 = ymnus (hymnus) yno = ymno (hymno) ynu = ymnum (hymnum) Hymnary - medieval liturgical book of the Roman rite containing the hymns of the Divine Office arranged according to the days of the week + the feasts of the ecclesiastical year. Its contents, often appended to the Psalter or to the Antiphonary, were later incorporated into the Roman Breviary. The principal features of the Offius are the chanting of psalms with their antiphone, the singing of hymns + canticles, + the chanting of lessons (passages of Scripture) with their responsponsorus. From the musical point of viiew the most important Offius are [?Matins?] Lando + Vespers. The Gregorian music for the Officus is collected in a liturical book called the Antiphonale. Hymns - songs of praise, rendered syllabicaally, or with each syllable sung to its own individual tone. St. Ambrose has been credited with a number of hymns but only 3 can be certainly ascribed to him (being so attributed by St. Augustine himself) Deus creator omnium, Aeteune rerum conditor, + iam surgit hora tertia. The Ambroeian hymn formed the basis for Cistercian liturgical reform in the late 11th + the early 12th C.

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"Now the third hour draws nigh." (Adt1 Cia.) Jam surgit Lora tentia, Qus. Terce [inserted] (Propaii de tempore) [end inserted] S. Ambrose 1) Analecta Hymnica Medii Aevi edited by GM Dreves + C. Bleme vol I-1886, vol 53-1911 (Vol.50 p.12) 2) Repertorium Hymnologicum - 1st seies in 2 vols 1892 + 1897 I nos I-22256 (#9400)* 3) Meanns p.46 Walpole p.40 MOnastic Hymnanies Benidistine Cluniac Augustinian Dominican Carthusion Fransciscan Cistercian [inserted] Meanns [end inserted] Written in France - Cambridge. U.L. Add 3322 Cistercian Brau. of c. 1250 H. 309-317 Written in Germany - London. B.M. Add 34750 CIstercian H. of XIII to melodies on 4 lines stave from West of the Rhine Written in Italy - Rome. Vat. Vat. lat 83 Ps etc of c. 1000, for Ambrosian rite H. 207-227b. [inserted] #4400 [end inserted] *Quaduag., Palm, domin, fest. Dom. et. oct.) L.3-8xh,d. S. Ambrosians BB. Ambrosian (1700-830); Benadines; Cistere. (1511), lxvjc. Cass., I. Williams + Hys. the. from the Parisian Breuiany - 1839.

Gothic names ("Hufnagelschnift") the typical Germanic form of names in the High Middle Ages. Whereas the golden age of the cultivation of Gregorian Chant recognized several signs as standing for the same [?] - 3 for a descending reume of 3 tones + as many as 6 for Two descending Tones, a single basic Type is now employed for each number, /: 1= P =t climacus ancus /!/ / v y=L podatus pas volubilis epiphonus franculus -Originally the central tone of a melodic figure was fixed by mc[?] of a single line + line + this Tone could be F, D, GnA. But soon the mute F is universally fixed, to which is added a C line above or below the others

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Families of Neumatic Notalions North Italian - Milanese Missive - Mitz, Clairvaux, Laon Central Italian - Anezzo French (Norman) - Roman Beneuentan - Naples, Monte Cassino Chantres - Solesmes, Touns Anglo Saxon Aquitanian - Limoges, Lyons St. Gall - Einsiedeln Visfothic (Mozanabic) - Toledo German - Bamberg Catalonian

The diastematic system followed an imaginary horizonatal line around which the neums were arranged. Examples of this are found as far back as the 9th C + by the 10th Chad become common practice. It would seem that the system originated in Southern Italy. By the end of the 10th C the imaginary line became a real one. The line drawn without ink (dry point) at the begining of the 11th C was later traced in red, it then meant f. The upper c1 was indicated by a yellow line. In French, English +Italian manuscripts c1 is sometimes found in green + in French manuscripts f also. Not very long afterwards letters which we know as clefs appeared at the beginning of the lines making the column of the line superfluous; but colored lines continued in Italy until the end of the 12th C, and are found even later in England + Germany.

1) Ambrose used the unrhymed iambic dimeter, a simple + singable form which has been in vogue even since at first unrhymed after the original models + later rhymed. 12) Heamanrous Contractus 2) Hilary, Bishop of Poitius (c 310-366) 10) Notken of St. Gall - Balbulus 11) Walsfrid Strabo 3) Prudentius (398-413?) - Cathemerimon - Peristephamon 4) Fortunatus (c. 530-600) 5) Sedulius 6) Magnus Ennodius (573-521) 7) Gregorian Magnus (c. 540-600) 8) Venerable Bede [inserted] f. mid 5th C. [end inserted] 9) Rabenus Maunus Carolingian rulers - Pippin, Charlemagne, Louis the Pious + Charles the Bald [inserted] 897 [end inserted] - guided the destinies of the Franks. Mark 15:25 "And it was the third hour, + they crucified him."

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