Club Minutes: Mutual Improvement Association, 1896-1900

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1897 Cherry Grove 27

Owing to the long illness and the decease of Jane Thomas Porter a beloved member of our society there was no session of it from 10/22 1896 to 1/28 1897 when on one of the stormiest days in the whole year six members and William N. Moore, Edward P. Thomas, Kate D. Thomas, Carrie L. Brooke, Mary P. T. Jackson, Emma Jackson, Rebecca T. Miller, Mary E. Thomas, and Mary Moore Thomas braved a high wind huge and shifting snow drifts and probable upsets and gathered around a roaring fire at old Cherry Grove to exchange cheer and counsel. We place the names of the two men present on our list of guests because for the first time in the history of the Association now about 38 yrs. of age, they were admitted and asked to take part in the proceedings. Sarah E. Stabler announced by note that her term of office had expired and she positively declined to serve longer as secretary. It was decided to postpone an election until the next meeting and Mary Bentley Thomas was asked to hold the gavel and the pencil for the day. Elizabeth G. Thomas gave as her sentiment an excellent scrap which enjoined upon all the importance of stopping to think of the children, the aged, and the stranger since, at best ,the time is short and the end near for us all. She also read an article recommending stillness as a cure for overworked and worn out people who fall into a habit of looking back instead of forward and

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waste precious hours and nerve tissue by speculating what results might have followed if they had acted differently on various occassions. The effect of such unprofitable retrospection being a diminuition of faith. Hadassah J. Moore sent an extract, tenderly copied by her faithful grand daughter Clara P. Moore, entitled " Grandmothers Champion"

A pleasant letter from Ellen Farquhar telling of mission work done in Wilmington and expressing regret at her absence was read by the same.

Sarah H. Stone and Sarah J. Miller had nothing to offer. Mary E. Moore read from "The Womans Tribune" a short sketch of the notorious Dr. Mary Walker which gave a different impression of this much derided woman from that generally accepted as correct by the press and the public.

She also had a pretty little poem called forth by the sight of a platform entirely covered with roses for Susan B. Anthony to speak from during her recent visit to California.

Mary P. T. Jackson read a poem whose heroine had the once familiar name in this community of "Betsey Lee". Lydia G. Thomas sent a message of love. Mary E. Thomas told of the weaving in Paris of a fabric at $250. 000 a yard which, believed to be the most costly ever made, was to be used as hangings in the apartments of the German Empress. Carrie L. Brooke read of the development of a new

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industry in this country by the introduction of lace making on pillows, for table covers and household decorations. She also read a story calculated to make the stiffest hair stand upright, of a man who had spent a night locked in a boxcar with bunches of bananas among which tarantulas disported. Mary Colt gave an interesting account of the training of dogs for the Red Cross service on battle fields in connection with ambulances and hospitals, they carry food and drink strapped on their backs in a small receptacle and are taught to seek the wounded soldiers. Rebecca T. Miller and William N. Moore did not favor us - Edward P. Thomas read some statements about the warships of today as compared with those in use at the time of Lord Nelson's battles the erst now being ten times as great. In addition he offered a newspaper clipping telling of the wonders of Kansas "The geographical center and lynchpin of the globe" which grew enough wheat in the season to bread the whole world for a week and has fattened enough cattle in ten years to drink the waters of Lake Superior dry, all being impossible to disprove.

Adjourned to Belmont

Mary Bentley Thomas Sec. pro tem

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Belmont

2- 2 -97 The Association met here for the first time with the present hostess but in 1889 the society was invited to hold a meeting for Rebecca M. Thomas at this place and the minutes were referred to & read with interest & sadness as well for so many who were present at that time & took the principal part in its proceedings have gone to the world beyond leaving vacancies which will never be filled.

The first business of the meeting was to secure a secretary as the association for various reasons found itself entirely without a presiding officer. After several futile attempts to do our best we fell back upon Mary E. Moore who read the minutes referred to.

Then the minutes of last month which mentioned an article read last time concerning the renowned Dr. Mary Walker brought forth many comments & some interesting accounts of her recent visit at the Northern Congress in Washington.

Mary Bentley Thomas gave a sentiment "Everything, said Epictetus, has two

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handles, by the one it may be easily carried by the other not at all". She also gave some account of the most famous cook in America Mrs. Sarah T. Rorer.

Sarah E Stabler read from "The Outlook," "My Retinue". Sarah H. Stone "The Dust in the Balance" a very good article from "Friends Intelligencer" and the origin of "Applepie Order". Hallie J. Bentley a little poem" Gladstone to his Grand daughter" & an article on naming children for vice presidents.

Mary T. Bond had no contribution.

Annie F. Gilpin read from "Ladies Weekly" for Margaret S. Hallowell an account of the first flag maker of the U S. Eliz. Ross of Philadelphia written by the former's niece Silla Hallowell. Mary Colt "What a child wants to be" containing a composition by a boy who wished to be a sailor. Anna F. Gilpin "Reminiscences of Key" related by his daughter Mrs. Chas. Howard only surviving child of the author of "The Star Spangled Banner and who at the age of 94 is still living in Baltimore. E. G. Thomas, comments

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