Club Minutes: Mutual Improvement Association, 1896-1900

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Martha Holland gave us "How the color line was broken". It was an exposition of the news of Booker T. Washington, the colored leader of the colored people, and if more of them would follow his teaching and perfect themselves in manual labor, they would be a better and happier race.

The next article, read by Mrs. Jackson, contained sound advice and urged upon young people the necessity of exercise to all comers. As increased physique is the result of physical training, and intellectual development that of study and research, so is constant watchfulness and care necessary for spiritual growth and the perfect rounding of character.

Mrs. Stone brought a few sweet verses called "In the Silence", and from Mrs. Steer we learned some interesting facts about the world wide favorite, Florence Nightingale. She is now eighty years old in good health and fully occupied with a book she is writing. The honor is paid her annually of an invitation to Windsor.

Mrs. Stone had several other interesting bits and after hearing them we enjoyed some racy and typical anecdotes of Lincoln brought by Ellen Farquhar.

If we would all take to heart and put in practice the advice of Sarah T. Miller through a selection entitled "The duty of laughter", this

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world would be merrier and life's duty's better performed. A systematic looking on the bright side gives not only courage but strength.

Albina O. Stabler had brought a volume of James Whitcombe Riley's and in a few lines carried us in his inevitable manner, from keen fun and humor to the sweetest and most tender sentiment.

Ellen Farquhar had quite a budget of good things, the principle one, an article upon the fascination of New York and of how her children loved her and remain true to her no matter how far they may roam.

Annie E. Gilpin gave us several amusing anecdotes and some beautiful and helpful verses by Cecelia Thaxter entitled "Courage".

Elizabeth G. Thomas read a story which gave the deeper meaning to the familiar letters O.H.M.S. and by means of the petty trials of a husband and wife and a mutual awakening to a truer appreciation of their importance, taught how even trivial work has its own dignity when performed as "On His Majesty's Service".

Sarah T. Stabler contributed an article upon the Summer Schools of Manhatten, which was listened to with great interest. The methods of teaching employed, are unique, but have proved very successful and have brought brightness into the otherwise colorless existence

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of many a poor little waif.

Caroline H. Brooke had selected an article replete with food for thought. This is the title, "Relative Values in Life". As all know that the full day is not always the one in which most is accomplished, and yet what to let go with advantage is the question. We learned from her the origin and truth of several nursery rhymes, and that handkerchiefs are only a modern necessity and were not used in polite society until the time of Josephine.

Eliza N. Moore was absent from the neighborhood but had sent her love to the Association through her sister Hallie Bentley, who then kept us amused for a little while by the adventures of Jimmie Brown.

This concluded our entertainment for the day and we adjourned to meet at - Magnolia February 22.

Elizabeth C. Davis, Secretary pro tem.

Sentiment for Belmont Mtg. "Every time we choose the good and avoid the evil we set an example to others. Thousands of small right acts done come to a great deal when they are taken together. Each generation has been better in something than the one before it and we must strive to make the 20th century better than the 19th for the sake of those who will come after us"

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On Washington's birthday 1900. while the deep snow drifts were gradually disappearing we gathered at Magnolia before noon with Hannah B., Pattie R., Cornelia, Alice G, and Alice T. Stabler, Nellie Hartshorne, Kate D. Thomas and Martha Vickers.

Elizabeth C. Davis read her excellent minutes of the recent meeting in Belmont proving what a good secretary she will make in future.

Mary T. Bond's sentiment was upon "Tomorrow and Today". - "Tomorrow hath a rare, alluring sound, Today is very fine And yet the twain are but one vision seen through altered eyes. Our dreams inhabit one, our stress and pain surge through the other, Heaven is but today, Made lovely with tomorrow's face for aye"

Sarah E. Stabler read "All's for the best", if there were no cross of sorrow there would be no crown of gold!

Mary E. Moore told us of new uses for milk, from casein are made billiard balls, hydraulic cement and a paste that is a substitute for eggs, curdled milk was said to be an excellent wash for outbuildings if colored.

Elizabeth G. Thomas read a story , from "The Woman's Journal" which turned on the old, old question of an allowance to a wife or giving her the

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disagreeable privilege of asking for every penny she spent.

Ellen Farquhar had sent from Washington an article by Mrs. Emily Bissell " What women think of women". Louisa T. Brooke's selection assured us that those who make the most noise in the world are not apt to be those who are most powerful as "great men think while ordinary men talk", high sounding words and showy acts may impose upon the few, but silent effort moves the world.

Nellie Hartshome's interesting communication gave some account of a Japanese Johns Hopkins graduate who had married a Philadelphia girl by Friend's ceremony; and she also read extracts from his book "The soul of Japan" which indicated the possession of both intellect and heart, he declared chivalry was a flower no less indigenous to the soil of Japan than its emblem the cherry blossom"

E. C. Davis gave an editorial from the Philadelphia Public Ledger upon "Energy and Repose" from which we cull "No honor is too great to give to noble persevering industry, its influence for good on the individual himself and on the community at large is incalculable", this unceasing industry was however claimed to be most deleterious to its possessor, if a capacity for repose

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