Club Minutes: Mutual Improvement Association, 1896-1900

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while testing his strength of character are not likely to be followed by most boys in their teens.

S. T. M's. this second piece was a laughable short story "Chlarissy Hun and the Flood". Elizabeth G. Thomas offered three newspaper clippings all excellent. closing with "Good Society is that which is not personal in its thoughts" Margaret S. Hallowell read of the wonderful strides in science of the last 50 yrs. A long list of what we consider essentials was appended all of which we would have to relinquish if we could return to the "good old times" reminding us of a sort of game called "What Gerorge Washington never saw", canned peaches, a woman suffragist, postage stamps, matches and an abolitionist being a few of the things named. Mary E. Moore gave a short account of her recent particularly exasperating experience in house cleaning and it was the general opinion that it was time Sandy Spring women had emancipated themselves from the despotic rule of tyrants of the whitewash brush and paste bucket by seeking more efficient and truthful assistants from adjacent cities or towns.

Albina O. Stabler read of the unhappy and discontented men who have troubles and perplexities no less wearing that those of the discontented poor. It was stated there were three kinds of discontent a discontent contemptible, a discontent natural and a discontent noble and productive of good works.

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Sarah H Bond told us that she fed very young chickens on dry oatmeal and hominy and she had proved the importance of mixing corn meal dough at least 12 hrs. before it was given to her birds thus enabling it to swell. Several others endorsed her methods. Mary S. Osborne read extracts from a sermon on "Character" by Joseph T. Smith a Presbyterian minister.

The secretary called the attention of the Association to the "Sandy Spring Outlet" a paper of one edition only, edited by Mary E. Thomas for the benefit of "The Children's Summer Home" near Catonsville all the articles for which paper were written by Sandy Spring people.

A walk to one of the neatest and prettiest of flower gardens disclosed much to admire and recommend and our hostess appeared to have solved the problem of rose culture judging from the great promise of bloom on healthy bushes. She gave a number of carnations to all who wanted them.

Adjourned to Walnut Hill * Mary Bentley Thomas

* Owing to the illness of Anna F Gilpin the meeting was postponed.

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The Cedars 6/24 1897

Owing to a driving rain storm members and guests did not settle into quiet until 4.15 P.M. While this had the effect of hurrying our proceedings a trifle still there was abundant time, apparently, for all who had gathered during the past month bits of whit and wisdom to aid or comfort their associates in this society for "mutual improvement": We like to emphasize our title occasionally it is so comprehensive. Our visitors were Mary N. Kirk Caroline H. Miller, Annie M. Shoemaker, Helen G. Miller, Fanny Hallowell, Frances D. Stabler, Mary E Gilpin, Sarah E. Kirk, Jessie Mc.Reynolds, Corrie M. Brooke, Julia Hallowell, Alice and Beatrice Tyson, so few of whom favored us as to suggest the thought that invitations might well be accompanied by a gentle hint with regard to the blessedness of giving as well as receiving. Ellen Farquhar's admirable sentiment was from genial Dr. Holmes

"I find the great thing in this world is not so much where we stand as in what direction we are moving. To reach the port of Heaven we must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it, but we must sail and not drift, nor lie at anchor". Sarah E. Stabler called our attention to the appointment of a Com. to prepare a memorial of our late valued member Hadassah M. Moore and Sarah E. Stabler, Sarah T. Miller and Eliza N. Moore were asked to perform the service.

Caroline H. Miller said she thought Queen Victoria

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had given evidence of a virtuous life by the remarkable endurance she had exhibited in the various public functions of the recent jubilee week. C.H.M. also read a pretty little poem telling of the difficulties which often beset the maid of all work when she tries to find a few quiet moments to write a letter to her loved ones over the sea. Sarah E. Stabler had a most original

"Sermon from the backwoods" of which we took a few extracts as follows "We pay the price of truth, very little of it is ever bought at the worlds bargain counter and it is the exception when a man takes to heart the truth gained by the experience of another. There are truths enough to keep the whole world busy; with all your getting get wisdom and with all your buying buy truth".

Margaret S. Hallowell told of their efforts at Oak Grove to eradicate the San Jose scale upon young apple trees, they had been advised to prune the trees severely and to cover all the surface with thick whitewash.

The name of the next contributor failed note but the article was a strong caution against the evils of overexertion in bicycling. Mary Osborne followed with the old but beautiful "Evening prayer at a Girls School", several expressed the wish that Miss Hemans was more highly appreciated by the present generation.

Sarah T. Miller gave a selection from the weird but gifted Olive Schreiner entitled " The Dream of Life". At this time the Association was pleasantly called to the telephone by Anna F. Gilpin

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who said she was thinking of us and she sent a message of love which was heartily returned and the wish of all present was that she might soon be able to take her place in our circle again.

Albina O. Stabler had a short but beautiful extract on "Summer". Ellen Farquhar told us she had conquered rose bugs by knocking them off and smashing them under foot with a humorous allusion to the value of a good understanding for this purpose. Sarah A. Bond gave a clipping that seemed at first to prove the danger of locking car doors in England and all prepared their minds for a tragic story, but the supposed lunatic was found to be merely endeavoring to reclaim his hat upon which his fair fellow tourist had unwittingly seated herself.

Mary E. Moore's article was a fine essay "Common Sense in Religion", a plea for the kind which is brought into daily use and strengthened with the using. "Religious character is developed, as everything else is developed , by a gradual effort and growth, a step by step process involving exertion on our part". "Speak Gently" a little incident in the life of the Duke of Wellington read by Mary G. Colt conveyed a lesson to all setting forth the old truism that genuine courtesy is one element of greatness. We could wish some woman much wiser in flower lore had chanced to be your scribe at the Cedars. But even as dense a horticulturist as your whilom secretary could

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