Club Minutes: Mutual Improvement Association, 1896-1900

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Mary W Kirk read " A sleep on lone mountain," a sweet, beautifully written, heart breaking child story.

Ellen Stabler excellent lines entitled "As you go thro' life"

Anne F Gilpin " The Legend of the garden" by Beatrice Harraden to show what constant ease and watchfulness are required to get the best from friendship. E G Thomas the answers of Thales one of the wise men of Greece to a series of questions.

Frances D. Stabler amusing verses about contented Jim. who always liked just the weather he was experiencing - a difficult lesson in this month! Sarah H. Stone's first article showed what a beautiful spirit may exist in an elegantly attired lady. The second was Emersons advice to his daughter not to burden today with what does not belong to it. Sally A Bond's verses. "My old home" referred to the bird which perishes after its in mate has forsaken it.

Lydia G. Thomas showed that the secret of a Happy home is the right living and feeling of all its members

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Lizzie Scott read a brief poem called "Butterflies" Mary T. Bond had nothing

Sarah T Miller some sentiments from that beautiful souled man Wm. Ellery Channing. Mary E Moore gave a portion of her mothers private record of her spiritual aspirations and experience.

Margaret S Hallowell an account of Buddapest from Stoddard's book of travels. Carrie L. Brooke an interesting article on the present or prospective Sir Walter Scott -- his lineage & family connections

Eliza Brooke "The Silent House" The hall of philosophy, where Emerson, Alcott, Thoreau, Lowell and others once spoke. Now a storeroom for furniture.

Then dispersed in a March storm to meet at Oak Grove April 30th 1896 at 2 O'Clock

Ellen Farquahar

Sec pro. tem.

Oak Grove

Eleven members of the association and as many guests met at the home of Margaret S. Hallowell on 4th. 30. 1896. The hour appointed to meet was 2. O'clock but the

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but the meeting was not called to order until an hour later - so few member having put in an appearance. After the minutes were read, the following sentiment was given by the hostess.

"The sweetest and happiest homes to which men in weary life look back with yearning too deep for tears; homes whose recollections linger round our manhood like light & sunshine and the sweet air in which no base thing can intrude are homes where brethren dwell together in unity where because all love God - all love their brothers - also where because all are dear to all - each is dearer to each than to himself"

Sarah T. Miller read beautiful lines "Why mourn"? Mary T. Bond's article told of the Fresh bread Charity of a Viena Bakery where millions of loaves were given away to the poor in New York City.

Anna F. Gilpin read a description of a mysterious mountain in South America which has never been explored owing to its perpendicular rocky sides it is rendered absolutely inaccessable to the foot of man or beast.

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Mary E. Moore had nothing to contribute of her own, but read an an article by Hadassah J. Moore entitled "The cruller Seller of Park Bank" giving a sketch of the old woman who had sold them at the same place for a number of years in N.Y.

Elizabeth G. Thomas contribution said in part "Oh! Friends, it is when I must take in what all this means when I think of what may really help & strengthen - of what - may most heighten joy & give cheerfulness in trouble & make all life most worth living it is there that I feel "the beauty of holiness". Jane T. Porter read "A life legend". Sally A. Bond one of Ella Wheeler Wilcox good pieces describing the two kinds of people on earth.

"Where ever you go you will find the worlds masses Are always divided into just these two classes. And oddly enough you will too I mean There is only one lifter to twenty who lean, In which class are you? Are you easing the load of over taxed lifters who toil down the road

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Or are you a leaner who lets others bear Your portion of labor and worry and care"?

A touching incident in the life of Abraham Lincoln was given by Martha Holland showing how much he depended upon divine guidance in the darkest hour of his country's peril. A womans view of wars [don] was read by M. S. Hallowell. Maggie Bond's lines "Place thyself last" were full of beautiful thoughts. The last contribution given by Ellen Farquhar. Letters read to [procure] what a source of pleasure & comfort they were. Messengers of joy and [sorrow]. Upword and onward was a good poem.

"Keep onward right onward 'till the prize is attained. Front the future with courage And obstacles fall. By phase and whose only the victory is gained Who keep faith in themselves And in God over all. Adjourned to meet at Fair Hill 5.28. 1896 at 2.30 Sarah E Stabler Sec

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