Club Minutes: Mutual Improvement Association, 1896-1900

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Helpful hints given by Mary E. Moore contained valuable suggestions with regard to health & happiness.

Josephine Mc Dowell was asked to give a recitation which she obligingly consented to do and with much expression gave a selection from David Copperfield.

Mary Colt's article told of butter being substituted for cod liver oil & its advantages as nourishment.

Hallie C. Bentley read some amusing scraps. Mary Bond's contribution was short but to the point - it said "speaking the truth may be a very good thing or a very bad thing".

Martha Holland read "Unseen toilers". The world is richer sweeter & better today because of that pure fragrance which ceaselessly comes up from the works of the unseen workers - the patient toiling unhonored souls who are content with their lot. F. M .Robertson says "The humblest occupation has in it materials of discipline for the highest heaven".

Gene Farcett read part of a sermon delivered by the Rev. Maltbie Babcock concluding with the following beautiful lines.

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Emancipation

"Why be afraid of death, as tho' your life were breath Death but anoints your eyes with clay

O glad surprise!

Why should you be forlorn? Death only husks the corn Why should you fear to meet the thresher of the wheat Is sleep a thing to dread? yet sleeping you are dead, Till you awake & rise - here or beyond the skies. Why not, with happy shout - run home when school is out The dear ones left behind! Oh! foolish one & blind A day and you will meet, a night & you will greet This is the Death of deaths, to breathe away a breath, And know the end of strife & taste the breathless life, A joy without a fear & smile without a tear And work nor care to rest & find the last the best."

After a pleasant meeting of two hours and a social half hour before tea We adjourned to Sunnyside the house of Albina Stabler and Mary Osborne

8.28.1896 at 8pm.

Sarah E Stabler Sec

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On the beautiful afternoon of 8th 29. 1896 the Association assembled at Sunnyside only eight members were present and about the same number of guests.

The day of the meeting was changed to suit those who had been in attendance at the Swarthmore conference and as it often happens when we do not meet at the regular time it conflicts with other gatherings, such as "Teas" Clubs and preventing some members from attending. The minutes of the last meeting were read as well as those of the former meeting held at Sunnyside

Mary Osborne gave for her sentiment-

"First find thou truth and then Although she strays , From beaten paths of men, To untrod ways Her leading follow straight, And hide thy fate, And whether smiles or scorn, Thy passing greet Or findest thou flower or thorn Beneath thy feet, Fare on! nor fear thy fate At Heavens gate ".

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Albina O. Stabler gave as her sentiment

"The true end of knowledge is not curiosity, it is not vanity, it is not profit, but it is that we may build up others - that is charity. It is that we may be built up ourselves & that is wisdom".

Hallie C. Bentley sent in her resignation as a member of our society which was reluctantly accepted.

Mary Bentlley Thomas in trust was invited to apply to become a member - we were glad to have another representative of her mother's family. of whom it had been truthfully said, "she was a most interested & enthusiastic member - never omitting attendance when it was possible for her to go to the meetings & always adding interest and instructions to them."

The first contribution from Sally A. Bond entitled "The Jewels of a womans life". Mrs Spofford a guest had nothing to offer nor had Sarah Lea. Margaret S. Hallowell read "The higher life" - a lesson of patience by a mother - her children having

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been her best teachers.

Martha Holland's article embodied "Thoughts on the new woman" which says the united standpoint, did not favor womens sufferage.

Pattie R. Stabler read lines by Edna Proctor Clark entitled "Mother Goose"

Mary E. Moore had nothing to read but gave an interesting account of the manner in which the arrangements of the late conference at Swarthmore were so successfully carried out.

Miss Nettie Johnson a guest read a short selection from Cannon Farrar.

Elizabeth G. Thomas gave "A Noble old age". The old age of any person will be the result of the life they have lived. Also "One day at a time" contained a useful lesson.

Albina O. Stabler's piece advised mothers to train their boy to being some girl's husband & habits of system & order early instilled were a blessing to the future wife.

Jane Porter sent her love to the Association her strength was not equal to sending a contribution.

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