Club Minutes: Mutual Improvement Association, 1896-1900

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Hadassah J. Moore sent lines on Charity, which were well chosen & acceptable.

You lose much peace of mind & happiness by harboring suspicious thoughts towards others. Overcome these by meditations within yourselves that as they pass thro' your mind they never bring any good but only doubts, mental confusion, distrust & trouble. They are enemies which you should scorn to raise. Serve God within yourself & be ready to see the good side of others".

We separated after an early supper as other engagements were pressing. To meet at the Cottage on 9th day 9.24.1896 at 2.30 O'Clock

S E Stabler Sec

Eleven members of the Associatiion with the additions of eighteen visitors and two dear little grand children of the hostess met at the Cottage 9.24. 1896 where we had a very enjoyable afternoon. After the readings of the two sets of minutes and the adoptions

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of the last months our secretary feeling it rather a burden to act in the capacity of hostess and Secretary Mary E. Moore was asked to take her place.

Elizabeth G. Thomas read "The best manners" which gave us the idea that we can not all make Vanderbilts but Christian men & women.

Lydia G. Thomas gave a very good selection "Silent footsteps".

Sarah H. Stone from Frd's Intelligencer "Doing little things well", which contained good hints.

Mary Colt read a very interesting sketch of Arlington Institute in Alex'a Va. which is in a prosperous condition with Miss Aure Chandler as one of its principals.

Ellen Farquahar's article consisted of extracts from the journal of her sister in law Isabel Farquhar giving an account of her visit to St Petersberg, Moscow & glimpses of her trip thro' Russia. She also told of eleven hours spent in London and what she saw in that time which put our heads in a whirl. Time does not permit me to mention all the places visited. Even if memory did.

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Eliza N. Moore gave an actual account of her voyage home from Europe. The seasickness her most interesting companion - her description of the trip thro' Wales was most interesting she compared it to a miniature Switzerland without the snow clad mountains. We might have been said to have had "an European evening". Mary Bentley Thomas gave "Some helpful hints " - a little poem by Fannie Peirce Iddings published some time ago in the Farm Journal. Mrs Moore's visitor who lived among us formerly and whom we love much gave us a short selection from Thomas A. Kempis

Pattie Stabler an account of the largest Institution in the world, Lord Roberts childs pet institute of fifty years standing.

Anne F Gilpin from Review of Reviews Dr Bernardo's School of Nobodys children which was very interesting.

Albina O. Stabler gave a childs odd prayer.

Margaret S. Hallowell poison and plants

We then adjourned to meet at Sarah H. Stone's 10th Month 22 1896 . One week earlier than the regular time.

Mary E. Moore Sec pro tem

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1896 Rosedale 25

The Association met at Rosedale the home of Sarah H. Stone 10/22, 1896. Only eleven members present, several who had attended the wedding of Charles E .Bond and Florence M. Stabler the previous evening were unfitted for the exertion of coming. Ellen Farquhar read beautiful lines " If I were wed I must die tomorrow"

Eliza N. Moore kindly allowed us to have the benefit of one of her letters describing a trip through parts of Germany and up the Rhine. Mary Bentley Thomas read " The Puritan Lovers" and some lines by Oliver Wendell Holmes. Lydia G. Thomas gave "Two Pictures from life" the first describing a heathen mother's parting with her dying child and in contrast, the Christian mother under a like dispensation. Mary Colt read "Speak no ill", lines we should all do well to think upon and practice daily. Anna F. Gilpin gave a touching story "The only way home" and she also read "Forgetfulness of the present". Margaret D. Hallowell and Sarah H. Stone had no contributions.

Elizabeth G Thomas read some selections from De Witt Talmage "What to do with children" which called forth considerable discussion. Martha Holland had an interesting article concerning Capt. Miles Standish and John Alden. Mary E. Moore read from Ladies Home Journal " The benefit of laughing every day", if it does not come spontaneously cultivate the habit, bringing happiness to ourselves and those around us. In

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this busy life some do not find time to laugh, those who do will be surprised to feel their burdens made lighter. Mary W. Kirk recited "Hark it is the trumpets sound," lines recalled after viewing the destruction caused by the terrible hurricane on the night of September 29th 1897 laying waste so many beautiful trees and causing great loss in many instances. Jane T. Porter's love was gratefully received and regret expressed that ill health still prevented her from being with us. Hadassah J. Moore's contribution with her " Love and continued interest" was most welcome.

" Resolutely build a wall about today and live within the enclosure," Mental exhaustion comes to look ahead and climb mountains before they are reached" Sarah T. Miller had recently attended the Indian Conference at Lake Mohonk and she told something of the proceedings there. Anna Bentley Parker was a welcome guest coming from her New England home. Adjourned to meet at Cherry Grove on 11th mo. 27 to dinner

Sarah E. Stabler Sec.

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