Box 15, Folder 11: Grass like Plants of Wisconsin, 1855

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Scirpus Polyphyllus Vahl, p. 161
Complete

Scirpus Polyphyllus Vahl, p. 161

[33] 34. Scirpus polyphyllus, Vahl.

Syn. S. exaltatus Ph. S. brummeus, Muhl.

Culm rigid, sharply triangular above, very leafy; umbel cynose-decompound, the spikes clustered in heads of 3 to 8, ovoid, cylindrical with age, yellowish-brown; bristles 6 pubescent downwards, somewhat crisped, nearly twice the length of the achenium. Culms 2 to 6 feet high. Flowers in July.

In wet shady places. Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan. Extends eastward to West New England, and south to Kentucky.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by EricRoscoe
Scirpus Lineatus Michaux, p. 162
Complete

Scirpus Lineatus Michaux, p. 162

[35] 34

S.2. Bristles capillary, tortous, not barbed, much longer than the achenium. Styles 3-cleft (Trichophorum, Richard)

35. Scirpus lineatus, Mixhaeux.

Syn. Trichophoniuma? lineatum Pers. Isolepis lineata R. & Schultes.

Leaves flat, rather broad, rough on the margins; umbel terminal and axillary, loosely cymore-panicled, drooping and terminal with a 1 to 3 leaves involucre much shorter than the long and slender rays; spikes oblong, becoming cylindrical, on thread=like parcels; bristles at maturity scarcely exceeding the ovate, green keeled & pointed scales; achenium sharp pointed. Culms 1 to 3 feet high triangular, leafy. Flowers in July.

Low grounds, borders of marshes &c. Milwaukee in Wisconsin; also in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan.

Plate I fig 11. a, the spike; b, a flower; c the scale; d, a stamen; e achenium and bristles.

Extends eastward to West New England, and south to Kentucky.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by EricRoscoe
Scirpus Eriophorum Michaux, p. 163
Complete

Scirpus Eriophorum Michaux, p. 163

36. Scirpus eriophorum Michaux

Syn. Eriophorum cyperum Linn. S. thyrsiflorus Willd. S. cyperinus Kunth. Trichophorum cyperinum Pers. Wool-grass.

Leaves narrowly linear, long, rigid, those of the involucre 3 to 5, longer than the decomposed cymose=paniclled umbel; spikes ovate clustered sometimes pedicelled, wooly at maturity; the rusty colored bristles much longer than the pointless scales; achenium short-pointed. Culms 2 to 5 feet high, nearly terete, very leafy. Flowers in July.

Moist grounds, borders of marshes &c. Throughout Wisconsin; also in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and about Lake Superior. Extends south to Florida.

Pl. 1 fig. 12; a, the spike; b, a flower; c the scale; d, ripe achenium and bristles.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by EricRoscoe
Genus VIII Eriophorum Linnaeus, p. 164
Complete

Genus VIII Eriophorum Linnaeus, p. 164

Genus VIII Eriophorum Linnaeus (Greek Erion, Wool or cotton; and phora to bear.)

Spikes many flowered, terminal when mature, clothed with long silky hairs; scales numerous, membraneous, imbricated all round; perianth (hairs) flat, numerous, much longer than the scales, persistent, collected into fasicles at the base; stamens 3; styles 3-cleft simple at the base, deciduous; achenium lenticular or triangular.-Culms mostly leafy.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by EricRoscoe
Eriophorum Alpinum Linnaeus, p. 165
Complete

Eriophorum Alpinum Linnaeus, p. 165

37. Eriophorum Alpinum Linnaeus

Syn. E. Hudsonianum, Mixhx. Trichophorum alpinum Ph. T. Hudsonianum Nutt.

Spike solitary, small, ovate terminal; scales somewhat coriaceous, keeled; bristles 6 crisped; sheaths at the base of the culm with a short awl-shaped leaf. Culms 6 to 10 inches high growing in a row from a running root-stock, acutely triangular scabrous, naked, except near the base. Flowers in May.

Cold swamps. Michigan and About Lake Superior. Extends eastward to N. England. A native also of Europe.

Env: NE!

Last edit almost 2 years ago by EricRoscoe
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