File 1: Hassall family, correspondence, volume 2, pp. 1-297, 1794-ca. 1823

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5 quarrelled with Major Grose. Yet to see thr Govr [indecipherable] me more attention than he does him gives him much pain. Mr. J. has been treated unkindly. I must & will take his part in what I see he is right but then I must not. It is not my duty to be at variance with the Gonr here if I can consistent with my duty & Conscience avoid it I cannot describe our situation it is such an uncommon one. Al the higher ranks seem lost to God & Religion & you may easily form an idea of the characters of the lower orders. While we were at Mr. J's their house was broken open & a good quantity of Sugar was stolen belonging to me. I had also 6 pairs of shoes stolen from me by Mrs J's servants. We do in the interval [indecipherable] morning [indecipherable] Mrs Marsden is very [indecipherable] & our little daughter. She desires her kindest love to you & will write probably to you by the next ship. Present my respects to Mr Stokes I am Dear Madam Yours & [indecipherable] (signed) Saml Marsden

Recd Feby 20th 1795

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page 7 (on verso of p. 8) continues from p. 4 and is cont'd on p 11

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Rev Samuel Marsden to W.Wilberforce, Esq. Parramatta, Feby 6th, 1800

Honoured Sir, Though I have already troubled you with a long letter upon the affairs of this colony [indecipherable] I think it my duty to mention another [indecipherable] of great moment to the happiness and prosperity of these parts of his Majesty's dominions, which is, the state of the poor orphans [indecipherable] provision is made by Government for the education, nor yet by individuals. It [indecipherable] be made to appear that a proper establishment for these children would eventually be a great saving to the nation, in addition, to, the religious, civil, and moral advantages which would accrue to the colony. There are, I believe upwards of eight hundred children in the settlement. Some of these children were born on the passage to this country; others, after the arrival of their parents. Their fathers, in general, are either sailors, soldiers, or prisoners; the former quit the country with the respective Ships they belong to, and the two latter have seldom either inclination or ability to provide for their children. In addition to these; some are orphans in the strictest sense; others relinquished by their unnatural mothers. From principles of humanity it has been an established custom to issue a full ration of provisions from the public store to every orphan or destitute child, as an inducement for settlers and others to take them under their protection.

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page 7 (on verso of p. 8)

completed, I purpose turning my whole attention to the creation of a school, and then I shall hope to see some fruit of my labours. We begin now to be supplied occasionally with mutton. Sheep thrive exceedingly well: the fleeces improve in quality yearly. In the course of time we shall be able to manufacture cloth. The number of ewes at present in the settlement is near 4 000. This year we have had several whalers fishing on our coast; some of them have been very successful, and will soon return to England with their cargo of oil. There is every reason to believe that a whale fishery will be established at Port Jackson; should this be the case, the whalers may contribute to lower the prices of English goods in the colony. Mrs M_ and my little family are all very well. My native boy, whom I have had now more than four years, improves much; he has become useful in the family; can speak the English language very well; and has begun to read. Should you be able, sir, at any time to send out a schoolmaster and mistress well qualified for such an office, they will be very acceptable. and their situation will be made comfortable here: none but married persons should come out in that capacity. The above I write in haste. I will give you a more particular account by the next conveyance. I am, Honoured Sir, Your most obedient, humble servant, Samuel Marsden

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2 9 Parramatta, December 13th 1794

Dear Madam,

I am convinced you will receive with peculiar satisfaction the informationmof our safe arrival in New Spouth Wales. I shall not soon forget your kind attention and civility shewn to me in London, tho' transported to this distant part of the universe. I have met with nothing so bad as we might have expected before we sailed from England. Since we arrived in this colony we have been very well provided with all the common necessaries of life. The climate is fine, and healthy, and agrees very well with my constitution. I have not suffered one single day of sickness since we came here. The country is very romantic, beautifully formed by nature, and will be most delightful when it becomes a little more opened. It abounds with beautiful shrubs and ferns of various kinds. We are settled at Parramatta, about 14 miles distant from Sydney, where Mr Johnson resides. There is a fine river, which runs up from Sydney to Parramatta, and boats continually passing to and fro, so that we can easily visit each other. I have one companion at Parramatta, the commanding officer's wife, (Mrs Macarthur) a very pleasant agreeable lady, a mother of three fine

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10

children. At Sydney there are several ladies, so that we have some respectable Society. Upon the whole, my situation is far more comfortable that I expected to find. I experience a great loss of religious Society. Our general Conversation in Company is very different from what I have been accustomed to in England, it all turns upon worldly affairs. Religion is seldom a subject of Conversation (excepting to edify its doctrines or professions,) never to edify one another. There appears (humanly speaking) little prospect of doing good. However I do not despair for the work is not man's but the Lord's. I trust we are not forgotten at a throne of grace by the faithful in England. The Lord had some grand design in sending his gospel to this dark benighted part of the world. And therefore this consideration shd resign us to His dispensation who worketh all things after the counsel of His will. You would hear by Miss Amey that I got a daughter off the South Cape of New Holland. The Lord preserved us both in a wonderful manner, and by good nursing of Mrs Johnson we both soon recovered the fatigues of storm; she is now nine months old, and a very healthy child. Mr M. joins with me in best respects to Mr Stokes and family.

I am, dear Madam, yours

Eliza Marsden.

Please tell Edward that the Melon - seed he gave me is now growing upon Kingston's Farm; I should be happy if he could partake of them when ripe.

(Received July 29yj, 1795.

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