File 1: Hassall family, correspondence, volume 2, pp. 1-297, 1794-ca. 1823

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31) I more than most men; have cause to be thankful for many striking interpositions of Divine Providence in my favour. At [indeciphable] my family are [indecipherable] God has blessed me in my basket and my store - and has given me all things richly to enjoy. I trust I shall see that I have not laboured in vain; and that in the great day of account some even from this foreign land will be found meet for the kingdom of Heaven. Difficulties I must still expect more or less; but I find now that it is not a little thing that will affect me. Should you see Mrs Henry Thornton, I beg you will present my respectful compliments and also to Mrs Wilberforce. I have the honout to br, Sir, your most obedient humble servant, Samuel Marsden

Last edit 6 months ago by Bobwil
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33 by and bye the Lord will command the wind to blow "stir up thy strength O God and come amongst us."

My little family are well. Mrs. M. has not time to write by this conveyance. She enjoys her health well. I take more care of her probably than you are aware of. I beg my kindest respects to Mr. Stokes. Inform him our crops are immensely great. We have the greatest abundance of wheat now and could maintain some thousands more people if we had them with dry provisions. We could also make plenty of wine, if we had persons who understood the operation properly; and should be very thankful if you could by any means send me out a few Hops cuttings. I think they would grow if they were packed properly, with a little mould in a case, and nailed down: and also a little Hop-seed; let it be put into a bottle and seal it up with a little sealing wax. A few Hop-cuttings might also be put up without mould, and sealed at each end. This might be a means to preserve them. Should it not be too much trouble for you to do this, I shall be greatly indebted to you. Hops would be of general good to the Colony. Mrs. M. joins me in every kind respect to you and Mr. Stokes.

I am, dear Madam Your [indecipherable] (Rec.d March 19th 1798) in hastde (signed) Sam. Marsden

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35 Narrative of Jas Mullen See pp. 39-40, 43-4, 47-8, 51-2, 55-=6, 59-60, 63-4, 67-8, 71-2, 75-6, 79-80, 83. [This narrative was eveidently/probably written by Rev Thomas Hassal for the author describes himself as son of one of the first missionaries to Otaheite. The missionary referred to was Rev Rowland Hassal] Evidently the author decided to reject his original title

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Parramatta. Sept. 6th. 1799 N.S.W 37 Dear Madam, It is with pleasure I take up my pen to inform you I received your kind letter dated September. 27th 1798 by the Hillsborough July 99. & also your valuable presents. Accept dear Madam my most grateful acknowledgements for your kind remembrance of me - not only for these being so acceptable in this dear colony as for this pleasing idea of being still held in remembrance by so kind a friend. I regret much the loss of your [indecipherable] by the Lady Shore, if what Mr. Marsden had in her had come safe, it would have made us very comfortable as at that time we were without many of those comforts of life, such as tea, sugar, wines, spirits, etc: it was very laughable to [indecipherable] down to formally to [indecipherable], or wheat. coffee; sometimes without sugar: since thats we have been supplied from India, which at that time we had been deprived of by the loss of the Sydney Cove. The Lady Shore was a loss to many individuals. - I am happy to hear of the welfare of Mr. Edward. I am sure he would make a handsome [indecipherable]: may he prove in goodness a second Colonel Gardiner, as he like him has the prayers as well as examples of so amiable a mother: when you write to him will you give my kind respects to him, & I shall always be [indecipherable] happy to hear of his being successful. - the parting with him must have been a severe trial to yours. I [indecipherable] for you, as I was [indecipherable] experiencing the loss of my dear [indecipherable], as we were going to [indecipherable] house with a Mr. & Mrs. Cover, one of the Missionaries that went to Tahiti & came to this Colony. Their intention was to return to England; if they had, it would have been a good opportunity to have sent him. Mrs. C is a kind good woman, they have no children: they buried a boy of 14 [indecipherable] as they left Spithead. I own it would have been a severe trial to [indecipherable] with [indecipherable], but the manner of the people are so corrupt & we cannot get proper servants about us, & there being not one good

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38 School,that Ishould have been very happy to have heard of her being safe with my [indecipherable] here in [indecipherable] he is[indecipherable] five years & a half older the [indecipherable] a little [indecipherable] very neat. Last Christmas we were near losing her by an intermitting fever, but the Lord in answer to our prayers spared her. I hope for his [indecipherable] to our comfort. My Charles is seventeen months old, & that is a very entertaining as well as mischievous age. Your goodness will excuse me for saying so much of my children, you must remember I am a young mother. Mr. Marsden has wrote to you a long letter, mentioning every [indecipherable] given [indecipherable] with to have about [indecipherable] & the colony.

Mr. Johnston is much better in health than when we wrote last. Mrs. Johnston continues to enjoy a good state of health. I am happy to have so motherly a [indecipherable] near one. [indecipherable] & Henry are two fine children. [indecipherable] , you will see what progress she has made in her writing, & it is a great pity that she is not in England: you can have no idea what disadvantages the children labour under, unless you were to pay us a visit. Give my respectful complt to Mr. Stokes & family, & believe to to be with the greatest [indecipherable] Dear Madam [indecipherable] Eliza Marsden We are suprised to see the alterations in the fashion. The format with white satin ribbons is much [indecipherable]. Dear Graham enjoys goodness [indecipherable] so taken the liberty to say a little white ribbon will be acceptable.

received June 2. 1800

Last edit 7 months ago by Roslyn
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