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SEED CATALOGUE AND GARDEN GUIDE

most delicious of vegetables. Any soil that will grow Cabbage will grow Cauliflower, as their requirements are very similar; but as the product is more valuable, extra manuring and preparation of the soil will be well repaid. Culture same as Cabbage, except that they need a cool and moist atmosphere and should be watered during dry weather. As the flower heads appear, the large leaves should be broken down over them to shield them from the sun and rain. Our stock of seed is the best imported. Don't fail to try it. These are the best varieties.

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HENDERSON'S EARLY SNOWBALL

Throughout the country this is consid ered not only the earliest of all Cauliflow ers, but it is more certain to make a head than any other sort. Its dwarf habit and short outer leaves allow it to be planted as close as 18 to 20 inches apart each way, thus making it especially valuable for market gardeners. Dr. E. L. Sturtevant says that this variety stands at the head in his test of 38 kinds, forming first head in 97 days, and above average in size. Our stock is grown by the originator, and cannot be excelled; per oz. $2.50; 1/4 oz. 85c.................................................

VICK'S IDEAL DWARF-Plants very dwarf, outer leaves erect; can be set closely; equally good for early or late planting; per oz. $6.00; 1/4 oz. $1.75.......

Extra Early Dwarf Erfurt-Valuable for forcing. A very popular variety in Eu rope and with Eastern gardeners. First quality; per oz. $2; 1/4 oz. 60c................

Early Paris-Well known; per oz. 50c.......

Early London-Standard English sort; per oz. 50c.................................................

Lenormand's-Best for late use; per oz. 65c......................................................

Cauliflower Plants-See list Vegetable Plants.

CELERY-Ger. Seleri.

One ounce will produce about 6,000 plants. This we consider one of the luxuries of the garden. No one who has once used it will be without it, and as it usually is so expensive in the market, the following simple directions are given, by which everyone who has a garden can supply themselves with it:

For first crop sow the seeds early in hot beds, or in boxes in the house, or later in open ground, in rich moist soil, covering the seed very lightly. When the plants are about three inches high, transplant to four inches apart each way in a rich well pul verized bed.

The tops are shorn off once or twice before planting. so as to insure "stocky" plants, which suffer less on being transplanted. After the ground has been well prepared, lines are struck out on the level surface, three feet apart, and the plants set six in ches apart in rows. If the weather is dry at the time of planting great care should be taken that the roots are properly "firmed."

Keep clear of weeds until about the middle of August, when it will be time to begin earthing up. Draw the soil up against the plants with a hoe as closely as possible, firming it enough to keep plants in an up right position.

Later in the season the blanching process must be finished by digging the soil from between the rows and banking it up clear to the tops on each side of the row of Celery.

Considerable labor is saved by growing the self-bleaching varieties.

KRAEMER-A novelty introduced by the

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Iowa Seed Co. This delicious Cel ery was originated by Mr. Kraemer, one of the most care ful and successful Celery growers in the country. It is the result of a care ful cross, and is one of the very earliest sorts we have ever seen, coming into the market from the first to the middle of June. It grows very rapidly and is consequently ex tremely crisp and tender. It is of a close, compact, up right habit; bleaches readily and rapidly. The flavor is exquisitely fine and rich, partaking largely of a mild and delicious walnut taste; oz. 40c..........................

Remember that $1.00 pays for seeds in packets to the amount of $1.35, and to deduct 10 cents per lb. if you have seeds sent at your expense.

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IOWA SEED COMPANY, Des Moines, Iowa

NEW KALAMAZOO-See novelties; per oz. 40c..............................................

NEW GOLDEN SELF-BLANCHING This new variety has fully realized all claimed for it, and is pronounced by all a great acquisition. The stalks grow vigorously with large ribs, very thickly and closely set. It is entirely self-blanch ing, without any banking up or covering whatever even the outer ribs assume a yellowish-white color of a very fresh and pleasing appearance. The heart is of a beautiful golden yellow, very large, crisp and solid. Unlike other self-blanching varieties it is an extra good keeper-keep ing well all winter-and of fine, sweet flavor; per oz. 40c;..............................

WHITE PLUME -The stalk and por tions of inner leaves and heart are natur ally white, and become fit for use by simply tying it up closely with soft twine. This variety does not blanch during the hot weather, but as soon as the weather becomes cooler it shows its self-blanching character; per lb. $1.75; 1/4 lb. 65c; oz. 20c.....................................................

Sandringham Dwarf White-Very popu lar, excellent quality; per lb. $1.50; 1/4 lb. 50c; oz. 15c.........................................

HENDERSON'S HALF DWARF-The favorite market variety; close habit, solid, crisp and tender; per lb. $1.50; 1/4 lb. 50c; oz. 15c.........................................

GOLDEN DWARF-A new variety of decided merit. When blanched, the heart is of rich, golden color, excellent quality, good keeper; per lb, $1.50 ; 1/4 lb. 50c; oz. 15c................................................

Large White Solid-Per lb. $1.50; 1/4 lb. 50c; oz. 15c.........................................

Boston Market-Very tender and crisp; per lb. $1.75; 1/4 lb. 50c; oz. 15c...........

Dwarf Crimson-Considered by some su perior to the white sorts. This is by far the best of all red varieties; per lb, $2.50; 1/4 lb. 75c; oz. 20c...............................

Turnip-Rooted, or Celeriac-Per lb. $2.00; 1/4 lb. 65c; oz. 20c...............................

APPLE SHAPED-The best and most handsome of the turnip-rooted varieties; per oz. 25c..........................................

Old Celery Seed-For flavoring; per lb. 50c; 1/4 lb. 15c; oz. 5c

Celery Plants-See list of Vegetable Plants.

CHERVIL-Ger. Gartenkerbel. One ounce will sow 100 feet of drill. Curled-Leaves used in soups and salads. Cultivated like parsley; per oz. 20c........

CHICORY-Ger. Cichorie. One ounce will sow about 15 square feet. Large Rooted-Used as a substitute for cof fee. Cultivate as Carrots. Take up the roots in the fall, cut into small pieces and put away to dry. When wanted for use, it is roasted and ground like Coffee; per 1/4 lb. 35c; oz. 10c................................

COLLARDS-Ger. Blatter-Kohl. One ounce will produce about 3,000 plants. Georgia- Sow seed in May; transplant and treat as Cabbage; per 1/4 lb. 75c; oz. 20c.

CORN SALAD, or FETTICUS Gr. Lammersalat. One ounce will sow about 20 square feet. A delicious winter Salad. Sow early in September in drills, quarter of an inch deep and six inches apart. Just before cold weather cover with straw or leaves; per 1/4 lb. 30c; oz. 10c...........................

CORN. One qwart will plant 200 hills; one peck will plant one acre in hills. Plant as soon as the ground becomes warm in the spring in hills about three feet apart; five or six grains to the hill, and when up, thin them out, allowing three or four of the strong est plants to remain. Give thorough cultiva tion. For a succession, plant every two weeks until mid-summer. We make the growing of Sweet Corn for seed a specialty, and have had a splendid crop this year.

PRICE INCLUDES POSTAGE. See special prices by the peck and bushel at the end of Vegetable List. 10 cents per qt., less if sent by express.

Early Des Moines-Since introducing the Early Des Moines to the public we have received many flattering testimonials of its great value as an early variety. It is as early as any we have found, except the Cory, with ears much larger than most early sorts; supremely delicious flavor; very proliflc. It has been grown and improved by some of the best market gardeners in this vicinity for something over twenty years, .and since its introduc tion to the public by us, the demand has increased very rapidly, especially among market gardeners. The quality is not ex celled in any sweet corn. Uniformly white cob. Per qt. 40c; pt. 25c.............

PERRY'S HYBRID-The largest early twelve rowed Sweet Corn in the market. Our crop this year, grown in the southern part of this State, matured only eight days later than the Cory, and the yield was more than double-being about sixty bushels. It does not waste any time making stalks, its object is for ears, large ones and plenty of them, in the shortest possible length of time. Per qt, 45c; pt. 25c...............................................

Crosby's Early-A standard medium early variety; per qt. 30c; pt. 15c..................

Moore's Concord-Produces handsome ten rowed ears, low on the stalk, and comes into use immediately after the Crosby's; per qt. 30c; pt. 15c..............................

March 1, 1889, "I sent for some of your Seeds last year and they all done splendidly." HENRY PATTERSON, Indian Valley, Idaho.

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26 Seed Catalogue and Garden Guide

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NEW EXTRA EARLY CORY-This new variety is undoubtedly the earliest Sweet Corn in cultivation, being about one week earlier than the Marblehead. It grows a larger kernel and a larger and more marketable ear than the Marble head, and will soon supplant that variety in our markets. It is well worth trial, and has but to be tested to be appreciated. Per qt. 40c; pt. 25c..............................

EARLY MINNESOTA-The standard early corn; ears fair size and uniform, and very sweet; per pt. 30c; pt. 15c......

STOWELL'S EVERGREEN-This is more largely planted than any other, being the general favorite with canners and market gardeners for late use. It is very productive, the ears are of large size, grains deep, exceptionally tender and sugary, and remain for a long time in an edible condition; per qt. 30c; pt. I5c.....

Black Mexican-A black-grained variety; one of the sweetest of all kinds; per qt. 4Oc; pt. 20c.........................................

EGYPTIAN SWEET-Very prolific, and by all who have tried it believed to be the best late Sweet Corn in cultivation; per qt. 35c; pt. 20c.....................................

NEW GOLDEN COIN-See descrip tion in Novelty List; per qt, 55c; pt. 30c.

Mammoth Sugar-This produces the larg est ears of any Sweet Corn, a single ear sometimes weighing as much as two to three pounds; quality very sweet and luscious; per qt. 35c; pt. 20c.................

Sweet Corn for Fodder-We can furnish either early or late; per qt. 25c..............

POP-CORN.

It pays to raise Pop-corn as a general crop. It is a sure crop, and the demand always ex ceeds the supply.

PAGE'S NEW STRIPED RICE-

The best of all for family use. See de scription in novelty sheet. per qt. 55c; pt. 30c.....................................................

FINE WHITE RICE-A standard variety which always brings the best price in the market; per qt. 45c; pt. 25c.............

MONARCH WHITE RICE-The best white variety grown; very tender and sweet when popped. It bears from three to six ears per stalk, weights 36 pounds per bushel of ears when dry, and produces 1,500 to 2,400 pounds per acre. It will pay you big to try it. Per qt. 50c; pt. 25c.....................................................

QUEEN'S GOLDEN-Color, a peculiar lustrous, golden yellow and when popped of a rich cream color. A single kernel will expand to a diameter of one inch. Very prolific; try it. Per qt. 50c; pt. 25c.

FIELD CORN See list of varieties under heading Miscel laneous Farm Seeds.

CRESS, or PEPPERGRASSGer. Kresse.

One ounce will sow about 16 square feet. EARLY CURLED-A well known salad. Sow thickly and at intervals during the season; cover seeds lightly; 'per 1/4 lb. 25c; oz. 10c.................................................

True Water-One of the most delicious of small salads. Will only grow where its roots are covered with water. Sow the seeds along the borders of running water and cover lightly; per oz. 25c ................

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UPLAND CRESS-This new vegetable is destined to become a valuable and im portant acquisition. It is a hardy per ennial, thriving on soil wet or dry. The young and tender leaves can be eaten raw, or as a salad. It is excellent pre pared same as lettuce, or when the leaves become large and plentiful, boiled as greens. In taste it is very pleasant, hav ing the identical flavor of Water Cress, so highly prized, and is agreeable to all. In pkts. only, each................................

Remember that $1.00 pays for seeds in packets to the amount of $1.35 and to deduct 10 cents per lb. if you have seeds sent at your expense.

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Iowa Seed Company, Des Moines, Iowa. 27

CUCUMBER-Ger. Gurke.

One ounce will plant 50 hills; two pounds will plant one acre.

Cucumbers succeed best in a rich, loamy soil. For first early, sow in hot-beds, upon pieces of sod or in small flower pots, six weeks before they can be set out in open ground. When danger of frost is over, transplant in hills four feet apart each way. For general crop, plant in open ground in May, about twelve seeds in a hill. When danger of bugs is past, thin to four strong plants in a hill. For pickling, plant in June. Sprinkle vines with plaster or air slacked lime, to protect from bugs. Slug Shot will kill the bugs. We grew 32 1/2 acres of Cucumbers for seed the past year, our crop of the Perfect White Spine alone being nearly 7,000 pounds.

Early Russian-Very early and productive; quite hardy; per lb. 80c; 1/4 lb. 25c; oz. 10c

Early Cluster-Grows in clusters, is ex tremely productive and of good quality. Our seed of this variety was grown on our home farm, and we think it cannot be excelled in purity. (See cut.) Per lb. 70c; 1/4 lb. 20c; oz. 10c...

[image] [From a Photograph taken on our Adair Co. Seed Farm.]

IOWA SEED CO.'S PERFECT WHITE SPINE-We are proud of our Perfect White Spine Cucumber, and well we may be, as prominent horticulturists and experienced market gardeners pronounce it to be undoubtedly the best strain in existence. For ten years we have been growing and improving this variety on our seed farm, and as a result we offer to our customers this improved strain, which has been pronounced by good judges as superior to either the Peerless or Arlington. The fruit is of even and good size, straight and always well formed and symetrical. When small it is deep green in color and of uniform shape, making it unexcelled for pickling. When of usual size for slicing it still holds its beautiful green color, shading to light green at blossom end. As it matures it turns to a clear, beautiful white, very handsome and showy for market. Immensely productive. Keeps longer solid and crisp than any other variety we know of. Outyields any other vatiety for pickles. per pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; 1/4 lb. 35c; lb. $1.20.

Geneva, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1888:-Seeds of the Perfect White Spine Cucumber were planted April 24th, plants in bloom July 5th, of pickle size July 16th. The plants were very produc tive and the fruits were uniform in size and shape, indicating careful selection. PETER COLLIER, Director N. Y. Agr'l Experiment Station.

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28 SEED CATALOGUE and GARDEN GUIDE.

NICHOL'S MEDIUM GREEN-A new variety, which is the result of careful selection. Fruit of medium length, nearly cylindrical, very uniform in shape and of good color when young; per lb. 75c; 1/4 lb. 25c; oz. 10c ....................................

Early Frame, or Short Green-One of the best, well-known; per lb. 70c; 1/4 lb. 25c; oz. 10c.................................................

GREEN PROLIFIC-One of the best pickling sorts. Its characteristics are its very uniform growth, seldom yielding fruit too large for pickling, and its immense productiveness; per lb. 75c; 1/4 lb. 25c; oz. 10c.................................................

Boston, or Jersey Pickle-Is used almost exclusively by the market gardeners near Boston for pickling, and it makes as good short pickles as any on the list; per lb. 75c; 1/4 lb. 25c; oz. 10c..........................

IMPROVED LONG GREEN-Old [image] standard sort; crisp, tender, good flavor; (See cut.) Per lb. 75c; 1/4 lb. 25c; oz. 10c....

NEW ASTROA rare novelty, sure to excite the curiosity of your neighbors. It is the largest variety we have ever seen. With common outdoor cul ture growing fifteen to eighteen inches in length and with very few seeds. Excellent for slicing; flesh white and very crisp. In pkts, only; 6 for 50c. each ..............................................

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Snake-A remarkable and very interesting curiosity. The cucumbers grow curled up like a snake with the head protruding, and sometimes are six feet in length. The illustration well represents their shape, and, although they attain great size, the quality is only fair; grown more as a cur iosity than anything else, and to exhibit at fairs; packets only......................... [image] West India Gherkin, or Burr-Makes a hand some pickle of first-class quality. Be sure and try it. (See cut.) Per 1/4 lb. 50c; oz. 15c.................

Russian Netted-This is really a curiosity in the Cucumber family, and withal a variety of excellent quality; per 1/4 lb. 65c; oz. 20c........................................

DANDELION-Ger. Pardeblum One ounce will sow about 100 feet of drill. The improved variety makes one of the earli est and best greens in cultivation. It is used also for blanching for salad. The roots when dried and roasted are often employed as a sub stitute for coffee. The seed should be sown in May or June, in drills half an inch deep and twelve inches apart, and the earth firmly pressed over the seed. The plants will be ready for use the following spring. Thick Leaved French-1/4 lb. $1.00 oz. 30c....................................................

EGG PLANT-Ger. Eierpflanse. One ounce will produce about 1,000 plants. A tender plant, which should be started quite early in a hot-bed or box in the house, which must be kept warm. Late in the spring transplant to open ground, two and a half feet apart each way in warm rich soil. From the time the weather becomes warm they are thrifty and easily grown. They are a decided luxury, which everyone should grow. Early Long Purple-Hardy and productive, six to eight inches long; per 1/4 lb. 90c; oz. 25c.................................................

IMPROVED NEW YORK-Extra large [image] and choice, fine flavor. The Best. (See Cut.) Per 1/4 lb. $1.25; oz. 40c.......

Black Pekin-The fruit of this handsome variety is jet black, round in form $1.25; oz. 40c........................................

GARLIC-Ger. Knoblauch. A species of Onion propagated by offsets; used for flavoring soups, stews and other dishes. Divide a bulb in small parts and plant them in early spring, in rows one foot apart, and from two to five inches between the plants in the rows. The crop matures in August, when it is harvested like the Onion.

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Garlic Sets-(See cut.) Per lb. 40c post paid; by express, per lb. 30c.

Remember that $1.00 pays for seeds in packets to the amount of $1.35, and to deduct 10 cents per lb. if you have seeds sent at your expense.

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