Club Minutes: Mutual Improvement Association, 1927

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THE CEDARS September 1st 1927 842d. Meeting.

The 842. meeting of the Mutual Improvemen Association was called to order at the Cedars on 9th mo. 1st, 1927 at 3:30 o'clock - the presiding officer being Margaret Moore, past hostess.

The minutes of the last meeting at this place were read - and the minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

The Treasurer's report showed $1.25 had been collected for dues, and $1.00 were for the Social Service League Drive.

Next place of meeting, Mt. Airy on 9th mo. 29th, one week earlier than the regular time.

The sentiment of the hostess - Amy Hutton - "If solid happiness we prize, Within our breast this jewel lies, And they are fools that roam. The world has nothing to bestow; From our own selves our joys must flow, And that dear hut, our home." Nathaniel Cotton, 1707 A.D.

Elizabeth Stabler appealed for garments for a box now being packed for the flood sufferers.

Sophia Featherstone read an account of travel in 1843 written by her Mother.

Miss Blanchard recited some original verses. Question. What about the Library for the Blind at Congressional Library? No one could give very definite information.

Mary Langdon Kagey a little poem "Keep on keeping on".

Mary Hutton contributed an amusing story, and asked that all become members of the Needlework Guild.

Rebecca Stabler advised all to keep newspapers handy and use then, particularly in the kitchen.

Mary Green gave a very optimistic quotation from "Grandmother Brooke".

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To the Memory of Martha T. Farquhar

In the passing of the members of "The Association" it has been our privilege to commemorate the lives of many noble women - The great gathering of friends present to pay their last tribute of respect to Martha Farquhar could not fail to inspire all there with a desire to help our fellow now. She was a friend

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2 to those in all the walks of life who needed help - She had a talent to make glad the hearts of young people, to direct their social & religious gatherings - Many can recall a supper party or an enterainment under her direction -

"By their works ye shall know them"

May the inspiration of her loving service be ours forever & ever-

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Mary Brooke's selection was from "On Friendships" by Hugh Black.

Rebecca Miller told that the City of Baltimore and the State of Maryland are preparing a memorial for those who died in the War, and the State W.C.T.U. will provide the funds for a drinking fountain, contributions for which will be gladly received.

Mary Scott gave a poem "Be Still" by Elizabeth Hawkins - unusually comforting.

"Be Still". "Be still, my human will, Be still, That Christ may speak When I am weak, Keep me from wrong And make me strong. Be still.

"Be still, O weary mind, Be still; And let me rest Upon the breast That shields from harms And all alarms. Be still.

"Be still, O resless heart Be still; The living light Puts fear to flight And joy shall reign Where once was pain. Be still."

Sallie Janney read of Queen Elizabeth's Ring which will be placed in her tomb - 326 years too late to save her favorte.

Helen Lea told of Daniel Decatur Emmett's monument. He wrote the song "Dixie" though the proof of just how the name was given is a mooted question.

Edith Green read some of Isaac Brigg's interesting letters from Baton Rouge in 1804.

Elizabeth Stabler read of a new type of college the main feature being the formation of character.

Mary Robison gave some comments on the "Quest Towel".

Marianna Miller read the old minutes at Alloway, Sunset, and Sherwood in 1868 and 1869, in which reference is made to the gavel presented

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by Lydia Thomas.

She advised all who have never visited the Eastern shore to do so if the opportunity presents itself.

Alice Farquhar's selection eulogized the milk cow.

Hallie Bentley read extracts from a letter from a niece who is traveling in Europe, and a poem by Helen Hunt Jackson, "One day at a time" Question. When should raspberries and blackberries be trimmed? In the fall.

Elise Hutton told of "Greenwood" which was bought from Richard Snowden in 1721 - about the same time that "Cherry Grove" was built. Also a selection telling of the beauty of the guest towel - usually more for looks than for use.

Margaret Bancroft's article on "Are you convincing" was itself very convincing.

Helen Farquhar's selecton "The Fly in Church" made us pity little children in Church.

Helen Hallowell read of Washington fast becoming an educational study centre on account of its libraries etc. She also announced a Rummage Sale for the benefit of the Social Service League and asked that we send nice things. She will give Nature Magazine to Oakley School this year.

There were no report from Committees, County or State Federation.

The Secretary was asked to write letters to Estelle Moore and Sadie Adams both of whom are in the hospital,

Others present were: Mrs. Winslow, Evie Jones, Florence Howard, Nan Riggs, and Miss Kate Hutton.

Margaret Elgar Sherman Jones, Secretary.

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