Letter to Thomas T. Sloan from Bridget Sloan, September 4, 1832

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Lexington Sep. 4th 1832ce My dear boy.

Your letter of the 25 Aug. came to hand yesterday. I was horrow struck when I read it, to think you are so indifferant about your situation. Why do you promise yourself that you will be favoured more than any other individual?, particularly when so many die immediately in your neighborhood. What infatuation keeps you? You must be deranged to stay when danger is awaiting you. My feelings are worked up some times almost to frenzy; me think I see you prostrated and no kind hand to administer those comforts that are necessary in such a situation. At other times I try to comfort myself by the reflection that you are young, temperate, and a good constitution. But Theodore, I this moment remember you were formerly imprudent in your actions; this I am told is very highly improper, it is sowing the seed, as it were, for the chlora. If you are yet in the habit of indulging your appetite, and abstaining too long at other times, I wish to God you would abandon it, and do every thing in your power to prevent you from getting that most horrible disease. If Mr Dowling was with you I should feel better satisfied, for I take him to be a friend of yours, as well as a man of good feeling. He is perfectly aware, that your relations here would ever be grateful to him for any kindness shown you.

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He also knows that you are dear very dear to your brother, grand-mother aunts and uncles. My own feelings is not to be in question relative to you. I have no doubt and hope that Washington has many kind hospitable inhabitants, but none can feel and see like a mother.

Why do you not write to Robert, he thinks you neglect him. He has an idea of quiting the clerks office for two or three years, and riding sherif. His health is not good, we fear that the confinement of the office is not good for him. I hope that resting for a year or so, he will become strong and stout. His time of life is a trying for almost all youth, for which reason he should use every precaution, and leave nothing unturned to establish good health.

Mr Christy got a letter from Fanny since I wrote you last. She says her Father is yet in bad health, but they are in hopes he is over the worst. She also speaks of receiving an interesting and welcome letter from you. She says you spoke of going to Philadelphia in your letter, for which reason she thought it best not to write to you until she knew whether you had gone or not. She requested Mr C. to let her know immediately. he has done so a week since Fanny is very anxious to return to this place.

Maganetta's little daughter has been sick with the scarlet fever but she is now well, thank God for she is a dear infant. I wish you could see her, I know you would love her. She is beautiful. She has long dark brown hair black eyes and round face. I wish you could of seen her yesterday. We were at Mr Bradfords with her. I set her on the piano stool, and her first impulse was to raise both hands and strike the keys. She struck them as hard as she could twice. She was {frightened} at her boldness, and folded her arms on her little bosom, and looked as if

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she was struck with some very strong feeling. We could not move her hands or eyes until we took her from the stool. When Miss Ann would play she was all attention, nothing drew her attention from those sounds that her ears appeared to drink with pleasure.

Mr. Christy will move in Mr Tilfords house on main street tomorrow. He thinks the house that he now lives in is not healthy. Mr Tilford has purchased the house that Miss Susan lived in last summer.

Your Uncle Thomas is holding court in Georgetown at this time, this is the last week for this term.

Mary Jane sends her love to you, and says you must not think by her not writing to you that she thinks less of you, or that she has not the greatest solicitude for your happiness and prosperity. Our servants are distressed that you will not come home, before you are caught all, Gese, in particular says, "Give my love to {master} Theodore". Do write the moment you get this, if { } not hear from you in two weeks, to a day, or see you, I shall be sure that you have the cholear, do not fail.

Your grandmother sends you her love and blessing. I do not believe that the change of air is dangerous, no not I. I am perfectly willing for you to try it. Be careful of your health and {privacy} for the grace of God, that your immortal soul may be pure, to take its seat in the land prepared for the blessed. Your affectionate mother Bridget Sloan

P.S. Do not say any thing more of a certain person. I do believe he respects you much than any of his mail relations- he never speaks of you but in a respectful manner. I know you doubt it. I do wish you would never speak any allusions to him, unless you change your mind. B.S.

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paid 27 cents by John Dowling

Mr Thomas T. Sloan Washington City

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