3 - Spring 1904

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[Image - head and shoulders drawing of young unsmiling woman with her dark hair swept up and a few curls falling around her face] IN CAP AND GOWN

Last edit about 1 month ago by jessicafrederick
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Editorial [Image - border around Editorial with rabbits and flowers]

Spring and examinations - these are the things that are occupying our attention at present. We don't object to spring - its joys are too delightful for that, but examinations - the very thought makes us creep. All too soon the examiner's blue pencil will descend upon the just and the unjust and none of us like to think that our papers will be weighed and found wanting. The idea of such a possibility arouses even the most hardened shirker and already tete-à-tete lectures are in progress on

Last edit 8 months ago by Carolebar
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porch and lawn, we are fishing out antique cribs and furnishing our vacant brain cells.

With this number the present staff of "In Cap and Gown" takes leave of its gentle readers. We trust the magazine has met with your approval and that your kind forbearance will consign its faults to oblivion. We thank all the contributors who have so willingly helped us in our work [so crossed out: ?] and may next year's "In Cap and Gown" be bigger and better than ever.

Last edit about 1 month ago by jessicafrederick
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David

The biographer must not linger over the circumstances of his birth and early education in the town of Waterloo. Babies and children are mostly uninteresting and especially when their latter career is better than the first Omitting therefore the conventional exploits in eating, fighting, running away and general disobedience, we may proceed directly to the beginnings of manhood.

David was at first in a woollen factory and moved about to various towns in eastern Ontario and Quebec. He still knows a good deal about dry goods and dresses always fashionably as becomes one who was a star man in the business. For his advancement was phenomenally rapid and people predicted that he would be a magnate. In six or seven years he Earned the various departmens of cloth

Last edit over 1 year ago by dblsearch
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manufacture, used his drawing skill as a designer and finally had reached the dignity of inspector at Beauharnois, a suburb of Montreal.

But trade did not satisfy all the needs of a soul like David's. If he has two characterisitics more marked than others they are a passion for argument and a weakness for poetry. So many of the great poets have been similarly affected that one needs mention only a few like Dryden, Euripides, Goethe, Browning, Tennyson and Lucretius. It is just possible that Mr. Cornish may have thought of politics, auctioneering or school-teaching as a more suitable field for his peculiar genius. But auctioneering seems to demand an abrupt, tyrannical nature, school-teaching is a thankless job and politics are at present hedged by no

Last edit 8 months ago by Carolebar
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