W. Kinsey diary, 1817.

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  • UPenn Ms. Coll. 919
  • Diary of an Englishman, possibly W. Kinsey of Bognor Regis, England. The first nine pages of the diary are written in pencil with the remainder in ink. The journal begins on 4 July 1817 as Kinsey embarks on his trip from London, England on his way to France. In the first few pages Kinsey mentions he is traveling with a companion named Henry. Kinsey includes detailed descriptions of all his destinations. He describes the streets in large cities and small villages, activities he observes, the people, and relevant historical events or anecdotal stories. Kinsey observes the evening ritual in Paris, as people pour out of their homes crowding every street, some being entertained by jugglers. He visits major museums, cathedrals, large cities, and small villages. Highlights of his travels in France include Rouen, St. Cloud, and Lyon. At the beginning of August, Kinsey enters Switzerland, where he spends a large portion of his journey. Kinsey takes a three-day guided tour from Geneva to Marigny. After this tour Kinsey gives the reader travel advice on guided tours. He describes the valleys, the mountains, lakes, and landscape of Switzerland. In the journal Kinsey has sewn in small cut out engravings of some of the mountain areas in Switzerland. Also sewn in the journal is a folded paper strip of hand drawn, colored coats of arms representing twenty-two cities in Switzerland. By 10 September 1817 Kinsey is touring Germany and talks of the Danube and the Rhine Rivers. He visits Manheim, Cologne, and Münster, among other cities. Throughout his travels Kinsey records the hotels and inns where he stayed and the prices. He writes of the bookshops he goes to and the books and maps he buys on the journey. Kinsey also records when he posts and receives mail. By early October 1817 Kinsey returns to England. The last four leaves of the volume contain a catalog of books he has purchased and the city. A plan for a trip to Holland follows the list. On the second-to-last leaf of the volume is a colored engraving with the words "S. Vulnera Jesu," Kinsey writes: "Given by the Capuchin monk at Staatz."

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    right bank of the river immediately below the strong for tification erected by the command of Napoleon, as a sort of tete du pont for Mayence. Biberich is indeed a su- -perb residence, but much disused & it is difficult to find admission within its walls. The blue mountains of the Rhein- -gau are seen from the Chateau elevatig themselves on the right bank of the river, which here resemble a majestic lake, whose waters reflect the villages of Schierstein, Ell- -feld & Walluf, adorning their margins. The particular part of the country called Rheingau, so justly celebrated for its wines, extends from Nied-Waluf down to Lorch- -hausen, on a line of sloping hills, fronting the south, and sheltered from the N & N:E. winds. The wine made in the vineyard of Johannesberg is considered the best of all the wines produced in the Rhine & sells at a price con- -siderably higher, than the others. The hills inclosed within the two places mentioned are entirely clothed with vine- -yards in terraces, one above another. Abreast of the cha- -teau our view extended down the river to the hills, Jo- -hannisberg, & [Rochenburg?] & further on the horrizon the [illegible] -eph of Bingen, where the Rhine appears to terminate its course. On the Mayence side of the river the view is also very interesting. Walluf is called the port of the Rheingau in the neighbourhood of Schierstein [illegible] the beautiful river of the proud Chateau of Trauenstein. Ellfield is the principal place of the Rheingau district, & is a pretty object on the border of the river, with its Gothic towers & country houses. At Hatten- -heim below, they make an exquisite wine called Marke- -brunner. Johannisberg (Mt St. Jean), divided into terraces rises upon a gentle ascent & overlooks a charming country! From the summit you gain the whole extent of the Rhein-gau, with its numberless villages & towns, its country houses, [illegible] the mountains crowned with ancient castles in ruin, & the Islands scattered here & there in the river. The vineyards of Mt. St. Jean comprise a space of 55 ar- -pens, & all the vines are of the "Riessling" speices. The village stands at the bottom of the hill, the Convent of [illegible]

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