W. Kinsey diary, 1817.

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  • UPenn Ms. Coll. 919
  • Diary of an Englishman, possibly W. Kinsey of Bognor Regis, England. The first nine pages of the diary are written in pencil with the remainder in ink. The journal begins on 4 July 1817 as Kinsey embarks on his trip from London, England on his way to France. In the first few pages Kinsey mentions he is traveling with a companion named Henry. Kinsey includes detailed descriptions of all his destinations. He describes the streets in large cities and small villages, activities he observes, the people, and relevant historical events or anecdotal stories. Kinsey observes the evening ritual in Paris, as people pour out of their homes crowding every street, some being entertained by jugglers. He visits major museums, cathedrals, large cities, and small villages. Highlights of his travels in France include Rouen, St. Cloud, and Lyon. At the beginning of August, Kinsey enters Switzerland, where he spends a large portion of his journey. Kinsey takes a three-day guided tour from Geneva to Marigny. After this tour Kinsey gives the reader travel advice on guided tours. He describes the valleys, the mountains, lakes, and landscape of Switzerland. In the journal Kinsey has sewn in small cut out engravings of some of the mountain areas in Switzerland. Also sewn in the journal is a folded paper strip of hand drawn, colored coats of arms representing twenty-two cities in Switzerland. By 10 September 1817 Kinsey is touring Germany and talks of the Danube and the Rhine Rivers. He visits Manheim, Cologne, and Münster, among other cities. Throughout his travels Kinsey records the hotels and inns where he stayed and the prices. He writes of the bookshops he goes to and the books and maps he buys on the journey. Kinsey also records when he posts and receives mail. By early October 1817 Kinsey returns to England. The last four leaves of the volume contain a catalog of books he has purchased and the city. A plan for a trip to Holland follows the list. On the second-to-last leaf of the volume is a colored engraving with the words "S. Vulnera Jesu," Kinsey writes: "Given by the Capuchin monk at Staatz."

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    & concealing their own frauds by the dark vale of spiritual ignorance, which they dare not lift from before the hearts of their flocks, that the R. C.'s, "of the Continent," have the form, without the real essence, of Religion, & consequently that the loss of a Church or two can only be considered as a temporal [illegible?] & not of material consequence to the cause of the Gospel. [Coblence?] was formerly the residence of the Electors of

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    22d. (File at Hotel: 5.[Frid?]10th)

    Rec'd [alive?] I was glad to greet my insufferable [couch?] at an early hour & commence my promenade on the town. [Ablence?] is now in the hands of the [supiders?], whose making extensive fortifications in it's neighbourhood. The streets are narrow, & wretchedly paved, & altogether it was one of the most miserably & uncomfortable towns I had seen on my tour. The Prussians have adopted one of it's Churches for a depositary of military stores, & another has been con-verted into a Granary. It is really lamentable to see such fine buildings so degraded, with many of their side altars still standing, & the columns & pictures as yet bearing mourn- -ful testimony to their former grandeur & design. But per-haps it does not follow, that either the Religion or the morals of the people of Coblence, should be on the decline, because the number of their useless Priests are diminished, on the altars of their idolatrous mode of worship be made subserviant to secular purposes. It is not from the number of sacred edifices, or from the wealth of a Priesthood, that we are to form an estimate of the spiritual condition of a people, but from those virtues, the fruits of sound & real Religion, which shew themselves daily in the common circumstances of life, & give a sacred character to the moral energies of a state. But I have observed, among the R. C.. of the Continent, generally speaking, a piteable absence of that industry activity & above all their cleanliness, & good order, which, themselves [?] next to Godliness, are con-stantly to be found among Prodestants of all Nations. In a protestant village, or town, the houses were clean, wholesome, well arranged, the people industrious & cheerful, their lands well-cultivated & their dress neat. Among the R. C. are found on the contrary idleness, dirt, beggary & misery in their extreme, in fact quite the reverse of what I have said of the Protestant. I conclude therefore, in the teeth of their Many gilded Churches, & imperious Ministry, wallowing in the [sick/rich?] mire of their religious impositions

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    near & Rüdesheim -! About 3 l. [leagues?] from Bingen we came to Bacharach (Bacciaraf on the banks of the nose at the foot of the a steep Mt. The scenery about this is XXX?, & many anecdotes related to prove the excellence of its wine, & their estimation in former times. Generally speaking you always find wines of an inferior quality in the Auberges. Kaub, on the right bank - & Oberwesel, & St. Joan on the left present the most romantic scenery.

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    was once entirely [illegible[, by the [socks?], [illegible] opposed a barrier against the water of the Rhine, forming a lake of immense extent between Ladenburg, [illegible], Mannheim, Mayence, [illegible], + Pfungstadt. This [cast?] heaps of in-closed water, it is said, must have [illegible] highs, than the barrier, +

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    called Flause, many beautiful farms, & habitations

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