Diary, 1786-1799

ReadAboutContentsHelp

Pages

26
Incomplete

[26] 11

COL.JAMES TAYLOR 4th.,

son of James Taylor 3rd, and nephew of Col. George Taylor, is generally called by the diarist "Col. James Taylor of Caroline." He married 1st, Ann Rubbard, who died May 27, 1789; 2nd, in same year (Sept,24,1789) Mrs Sarah Taliaferro; and 3rd, Mrs Elizabeth Fitzhugh Conway. He was a man of strong character and predominating influences. Children: 1. Lucy, married James Eubank, 2. Hubbard, married Clarissa Minor, 3. Elizabeth, married Thomas Minor, 4. James (5th), married Mrs. Keturah Moss Leitch. 5. Alice, married Sept. 27, 1791, Washington Berry. 6. Ann, married 1st, Robert Taliaferro, 2nd John Todd. 7. Reuben, Married Mary Thornton, 8. Edmund, married Mary T. Hinde, 9. Mary T., married Peter Thornton,

ROBERT TAYLOR, son of Erasmus, and nephew of Col. George Taylor, born 1763, married Frances Pendleton, of Caroline Co., and was a lawyer. His home was called "Red Bud," and the writer thinks it was in Caroline Co. He is [?] mentioned in the diaries. Children: 1. Robert, married Mary C. Taylor, daughter of Dr. Charles Taylor, and grand-daughter of Col. George. 2. Mildred, married Hay Taliaferro. 3. Edmund Pendleton (Dr.), married Mildred Turner. 4. Lucinda A., married James Shepherd. 5. Jacquelin P., married Martha Richardson. 6. Jane F., married John Hart. 7. Alexander F., married Mildred C. Lindsay, 8. Howard. Major Erasmus Taylor, now (1900) living at "Meadow Farm," is a son of Edmund Pendleton Taylor and Mildred Turner.

HUBBARD TAYLOR, son of Col. James Taylor 4th, grand-son of James Taylor 3rd, grand-nephew of Col. George Taylor (and second cousin of the diarist and his brothers) born Aug. 2,1760; married Clarissa Minor, moved to Ky., Oct. 21, 1788 and died there in 1842. He was one of the early surveyors of Kentucky. His home in Orange Co. Va., was called "Ararat," He came back to Va. in 1789 and sold it Dec.7, 1789 for £1,000: to William Taylor, formerly a merchant of Fredericksburg. He bought his Kentucky land from Col. Frank Taylor (the diarist), March 22, 1790, at which time he was again in Va. The land consisted of 1,000 acres on Brush Creek, 620 acres on Cumberland River, 1,000 on _________ Creek, and 1/3 of 3,000 acres on Blackford's Creek. Col. Frank Taylor also agreed to convey to Hubbard Taylor, 1/2 of 3,000 acres more located by a man named Kennedy, when his title was secured. Hubbard Taylor left eight children and his descendants now in Ky----and elsewhere are legion.

From the TAYLOR DIARY #1907-z in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill. FOR REFERENCE ONLY: PERMISSION TO PUBLISH MUST BE REQUESTED. WARNING: MOST MANUSCRIPTS ARE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT.

Last edit over 3 years ago by Jannyp
27
Incomplete

[27] 12 JAMES TAYLOR 5th, brother of the preceding (Hubbard), married Mrs. Keturah Moss Leitch. He removed to Ky. and was the founder of the City of Newport, opposite Cincinati, O. During the War of 1812, he became Quarter-Master General of the Western Army. He was born April 19, 1769 and died November 7, 1848. James Taylor 5th, returned to Virginia in __________ and was entertained by his relatives generally. MAJOR FRANCIS TAYLOR, mentioned in diary, June 13, 1786, was a son of Major Francis Taylor and his wife. Ann Craddock, and a grandson of James Taylor 3rd. He was therefore grand-nephew of Col George Taylor and second cousin of the diarist and brothers. PHIL. TAYLOR, mentioned in the diary as being indigent was not a near relative. There was a Philip Taylor, a son of John Taylor, born 1696, who in turn was son of James Taylor, the emigrant, by his second wife, Mary Gregory and this one may have been his son. Col. John Taylor of Caroline was descended from the second wife of James the emigrant; the Orange County Taylors from the emigrant's first wife. [Note-by P.F.T.,--Philip Taylor, above, was Philip W. Taylor, born Jan. 15, 1765; died February 1856; married March 18, 1788, Elizabeth Poor. He was the youngest child of Major Francis Taylor and his wife, Ann Craddock. Philip W. Taylor went toKentucky in 1781 with Hubbard Taylor and in 1786 was wounded in the arm, in a fight with the Indians. He removed with his wife to Kentucky October 10th 1788 and settled in Jessamine County. He was "among the most indefatigable and useful of the local preachers (Methodist.). He was born Jan.15,1765; entered the Continental Army and was at the siege of Yorktown and the surrender of Cornwallis.In 1786 he came to Kentucky; while descending the Ohio River he was fired on by Indians and had one arm shattered by a ball; his wound confined him for six months at the Falls of the Ohio. In 1788 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Poor and a short time afterwards they both converted and joined the M.E.Church. At the conference held in October 1800 he was ordained a deacon by Bishop Asbury and subsequently elected to Elder's orders but was refused ordination in consequence of his connection with slavery. He died February 1856, aged 91, at the residence of his son-in-law John Wright. Of a fearless disposition, he was one of the number who, on two different occasions, accompanied Bishop Asbury through the "Wilderness" on his early Episcopal visits to Kentucky." Methodism in Kentucky.] Kentucky Pension Roll, Doc.514. "Philip W.Taylor; Private, Virginia State Line, Spencer Co.Ky., Amount allowed, $20.00 Amount Received $40.00 Placed on Roll, Feb.23,1833. Pay Commenced Mar. 4, 1831 From the TAYLOR DIARY #1907-z in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill. FOR REFERENCE ONLY: PERMISSION TO PUBLISH MUST BE REQUESTED. WARNING: MOST MANUSCRIPTS ARE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT.

Last edit about 4 years ago by michellezitney
28
Incomplete

[28] 13 WILLIAM TAYLOR of Fredericksburg, a merchange of that place, bought from Hubbard Taylor, on Dec.7,1789, for £1,000. the latter's farm in Orange Co., called "Ararat" and renamed it "Red Plains" (See May 14-16, 1791,). He resold the place, Dec.14,1791 to Major E.Langham. William Taylor had a son, named George, who appears to have been intimate with the diarist. Dr. Grinnan, of Madison Mills, Va. thinks William Taylor of Fredericksburg was not of the Orange Co. Taylors, which is doubtless true. I am quite inclined to believe he was a descendant of the original James Taylor, the emigrant, through Sarah Gregory, the second wife, and her son, John (b.1696) who married Catherine Pendleton, daughter of Philip and Isabella Hart Pendleton. This John had a son, named William, who married a Miss Anderson and he may have been William Taylor of Fredericksburg. Col.John Taylor of Caroline, U.S. Senator & c.(b.1756) also had a son William, but too late to have been William Taylor of Fredericksburg. COLONEL ALCOCK, mentioned several times in the earlier diaries, was a member of society, a friend of Col.George Taylor and his family and a hospitable dispenser of good cheer of the liquid varieties. He married January 18, 1786, Mrs.Bell, who was probably the mother of Thomas Bell and thus in a round-about way was a sort of connection of the Taylors. THE BARBOUR FAMILY, was one of the most influential and aristocratic in Va., at this period and among its branches were many noted men. The Taylors and Barbours were connected by frequent intermarriages, and so all were "cousins". Mary Taylor, daughter of James, the Clerk and granddaughter of Col.George Taylor, married Thomas, son of Col.James Barbour; and Lucy, daughter of Commodore Richard, also granddaughter of Col.George, married Phil Barbour. Col.James Barbour lived in Madison Co., and Col.Thomas Barbour, his brother, lived in Orange. Col.James Barbour moved to Carrard Co.Ky., and died there in 1804. The Barbours also intermarried with the Pendletons, and so were doubly related to the Taylors. Among the distinguished Barbours may be mentioned Judge Philip Pendleton Barbour, M.C. from Va.; speaker of the House of Representatives and Associate Justice U.S. Supreme Court 1836-41. Also James Barbour, U.S.Senator from Va., See'y of War under John Quincy Adams, and Minister to England. Governor of Virginia THOMAS BELL, whose name is met with almost every page of the diaries, married Elizabeth Taylor, daughter of Zachary Taylor(the elder) and niece of Col.George Taylor. Her mother's maiden name was Elizabeth Lee and her maternal grand-parents were Hancock Lee and Sarah Allerton. Thomas Bell was one of the Orange Co. Committee of Safety in 1774 and he was a prominent man in the community. Died March 2, 1796. Children: 1. John, married July 5, 1797, Judith Burnley, daughter of Col.[2?].Burnley. 2. Thomas Jr. 3. Henry, married Dec.17,1790, Elizabeth Alcock. 4. James. 5.Ann ("Nancy"). 6. Mildred. 7. Margaret. 8. Sarah, died Aug.20,1791. (1. John Bell died Apl.25,1790. His wife, Judy B. died May 25, 1790.) From the TAYLOR DIARY #1907-z in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill. FOR REFERENCE ONLY: PERMISSION TO PUBLISH MUST BE REQUESTED. WARNING: MOST MANUSCRIPTS ARE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT.

Last edit about 4 years ago by michellezitney
29
Incomplete

[29] 14 CAPTAIN GARLAND BURNLEY, son of Col.Zachariah Burnley (one of the Orange Co.Committee of Safety, in 1774) married Frances Taylor, daughter of Erasmus, and niece of Col.George Taylor. Capt. Burnley lived adjoining "Midland" and was in evidence at all family gatherings and social events. He was of a convivial nature and often indulged too freely in the flowing bowl. When Col.George Taylor died, Capt. Burnley assisted in "laying out" etc. He died in 1793, leaving surviving, his wife and two daughters: (48) Sarah, who married William Day Taylor. Judith, married Thomas B.Adams. Two other daughters, Lucy and Jane, died in August 1788. Judith Burnley was baptized by Rev.Alex'r Balmain (her uncle by marriage), of Winchester, on May 18, 1788. The Burnley place was about 1/2 mile east of where Dr. Grinnan now (1900) lives. Capt. Burnley served under Col.Francis Taylor(the diarist) in the Regiment known as the "Virginia Convention Guards." THE CATLETT FAMILY, was related to the Taylors through a number of intermarriages. Col.George Taylor's first wife, Rachel Gibson;s mother's maiden name was Margaret Catlett, and her(M.C.'s) grand-father was Col.John Catlett of Port Royal, Va. who was killed by the Indians at the Port Royal fort in 1670. The Catletts also intermarried with the Moores, the Conways and the Taliaferros, and through them were connections of the Taylors. THE CHEW FAMILY, See under head of Martha Taylor. THE CONWAY FAMILY, was one of the prominent ones socially in Orange Co. in Colonial times and since, and all were recognized as relatives by the Taylors. Col.George Taylor's 2nd, wife was Mrs. Sarah Taliaferro Conway. Her daughter, Sarah Conway, married Dr. Charles Taylor, son of Col.George Taylor, and Harriet Taylor, daughter of Dr. Charles, married Catlett Conway. The old Conway homestead is now (1900) owned by a Mr. Crenshaw. CAPTAIN FRANCIS DADE, owner of Dade's Mills, was a great friend of the Taylors, and in later generations the two families intermarried. He died May 28, 1791. Dade's Mills were on the Rapidan River, about two miles below the present Madison Mills. His residence was near by. It was a favorite rendezvous for fishing parties among the gentry of Orange and Madison Cos. The Mills were later called Peyton's Mills and were destroyed by a flood in 1862. From the TAYLOR DIARY #1907-z in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill. FOR REFERENCE ONLY: PERMISSION TO PUBLISH MUST BE REQUESTED. WARNING: MOST MANUSCRIPTS ARE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT.

Last edit about 4 years ago by michellezitney
30
Incomplete

[30] 15 JAMES GAINES, was Sheriff of Orange Co., in 1786-87. He died Nov.25, 1788. "Old Mrs.Gaines," who went about and officiated at births, was probably his mother. There was a distant connection between the Taylors and the Caines's , the latter having descended from Mary Taylor, daughter of James Taylor, the emigrant, by his second wife, Mary Gregory. She(Nary Taylor) married Henry Pendleton and afterwards Ed.Watkins. Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines of the War of 1812, was of this family. JONATHAN GIBSON, was father of Rachel, Col. George Taylor's first wife, and so was grandfather of the diarist and all his own brothers. In 1736, Jonathan Gibson was a member of the Va.House of Burgesses, from Caroline Co. He was also Clerk of Orange Co. for many years. He died while yet in his prime from accidental poisoning. Jonathan Gibson was one of the God-fathers of President Madison. Col. George Taylor's son, Jonathan, was named in his honor. Jonathan Taylor's eldest son, William, married Nov.26,1795, Susan, or Susannah Gibson and she was daughter of John Gibson, who in turn was gradson of Jonathan Gibson. That is to say; William Taylor and his wife, Susan, or Susannah Gibson, were both great-grandchildren of Jonathan Gibson. The names "Gibson" and "Jonathan" appear to this day in every generation of the Taylor. ANDREW GLASSELL, a Scotchman, married Elizabeth Taylor, daughter of Erasmus and niece of Col. George. They had nine children. Dr. Andrew Glassell Grinnan, of Madison Mills, from whom the writer purchased the Diaries of Col.Frank Taylor, is one of their descendants. Perhaps no living (1900, since deceased) person is as well versed in Taylor history and traditions as he, and he must soon pass away. Dr. Grinnan died in 1902. CHARLES P. HOWARD, often mentioned in the diaries, married Jane Taylor, youngest daughter of Erasmus and niece of Col.George Taylor. He was a merchant at Orange C.H. MAJOR LEE, merchant at Orange C.H. and also of Madison C.H., was probably a brother of Elizabeth Lee, whom Zachary Taylor, the elder, married. From the TAYLOR DIARY #1907-z in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill. FOR REFERENCE ONLY: PERMISSION TO PUBLISH MUST BE REQUESTED. WARNING: MOST MANUSCRIPTS ARE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT.

Last edit about 4 years ago by michellezitney
Displaying pages 26 - 30 of 430 in total