histmss-074995-0002

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Jannyp at Oct 31, 2022 08:53 PM

histmss-074995-0002

[left column]
medium for most of the stories and poems
published by Mr. Kipling during its lifetime.
The same is true of the writings of Anthony
H [illegible] and Robert Louis Stevenson. And these
are only examples of a policy which must be
by now perfectly familiar to our friends.

It is more interesting, however, to look
ahead and talk about what we are going to
do. We give herewith a brief description
of some of the articles and stories which we
hope will not only retain the support of our
present friends, but bring us new allies.

A SERIAL BY RUDYARD KIPLING.—As in
previous years, all, or nearly all, of Mr. Kip-
ling's stories will be published in this maga-
zine. Speaking of his story "In Ambush,"
published in our August number, the "Brook-
lyn Eagle" said: "If he were to write a
continued story of school life on the line
indicated in this sketch, it would be as suc-
cessful a book as 'Tom Brown' or 'Huckle-
berry Finn.' " Such a book Mr. Kipling is
now writing for us, and we expect to begin
the publication of it in January. It will
consist of six stories, each complete in
itelf, but all dealing with the same charac-

[right column]
Strategy, is recognized everywhere as the
foremost living authority on naval power
and warfare. McCLURE'S MAGAZINE has
secured the exclusive use of whatever he
may write on the subject of the war; and
he will contribute to the magazine an expo-
sition and interpretation of the war, particu-
larly in its naval engagements and aspects.
It is safe to say that there will be nothing
produced in all the literature of the war of
higher interest and significance than Captain
Mahan's contribution.

KIPLING'S NEW VOLUME OF STORIES.

A new volume of stories by Mr. Rudyard
Kipling is about as big a literary event as the
times can give us, and its announcement is
unquestionably a matter of deep personal
interest to a larger number of English-speak-
ing people than any other such announce-
ment could be. Now most able critics would
take the ground that this dual statement is
somewhat paradoxical: that the biggest lit-
erary event has not been in the past the one
591

histmss-074995-0002

[left column]
medium for most of the stories and poems
published by Mr. Kipling during its lifetime.
The same is true of the writings of Anthony
H [illegible] and Robert Louis Stevenson. And these
are only examples of a policy which must be
by now perfectly familiar to our friends.

It is more interesting, however, to look
ahead and talk about what we are going to
do. We give herewith a brief description
of some of the articles and stories which we
hope will not only retain the support of our
present friends, but bring us new allies.

A SERIAL BY RUDYARD KIPLING.—As in
previous years, all, or nearly all, of Mr. Kip-
ling's stories will be published in this maga-
zine. Speaking of his story "In Ambush,"
published in our August number, the "Brook-
lyn Eagle" said: "If he were to write a
continued story of school life on the line
indicated in this sketch, it would be as suc-
cessful a book as 'Tom Brown' or 'Huckle-
berry Finn.' " Such a book Mr. Kipling is
now writing for us, and we expect to begin
the publication of it in January. It will
consist of six stories, each complete in
itelf, but all dealing with the same charac-

[right column]
Strategy, is recognized everywhere as the
foremost living authority on naval power
and warfare. McCLURE'S MAGAZINE has
secured the exclusive use of whatever he
may write on the subject of the war; and
he will contribute to the magazine an expo-
sition and interpretation of the war, particu-
larly in its naval engagements and aspects.
It is safe to say that there will be nothing
produced in all the literature of the war of
higher interest and significance than Captain
Mahan's contribution.

KIPLING'S NEW VOLUME OF STORIES.

A new volume of stories by Mr. Rudyard
Kipling is about as big a literary event as the
times can give us, and its announcement is
unquestionably a matter of deep personal
interest to a larger number of English-speak-
ing people than any other such announce-
ment could be. Now most able critics would
take the ground that this dual statement is
somewhat paradoxical: that the biggest lit-
erary event has not been in the past the one
591