Club Minutes: Mutual Improvement Association, 1912-1916

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Bound 201-page ledger containing original, handwritten minutes from December 6, 1912 to October 19, 1916 for the Mutual Improvement Association society located in Sandy Spring, Maryland. The Mutual Improvement Association has met continuously since May 1, 1857.

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List of Association Members, 3-26-1918
Hallie J. Bentley \ Mary Scott
Elma P. Chandlee Fanny B. Snowden
Annie M. Chandlee / Albina O. Stabler
Elizabeth C. Davis Elizabeth T. Stabler
India Downey Virginia Steer
Ellen Farquhar Mary Bentley Thomas \
Mary E. Gilpin \ Mary E. Thomas /
Emilie T. Massey / Alice Tyson
Julia Hallowell Sarah F. Willson
Amy Hutton \
Elise Hutton
Mary B. Hutton /
Sallie R. Janney Waiting List
Sarah T. Miller \ Sarah T. M. Adams
Rebecca T. Miller / Mariana S. Miller
Eliza N. Moore Margaret E. Jones
Margaret C. Bancroft Mary Nicholls
Estelle T. Moore
Margaret G. T. Moore
Waiting List Sarah T. M. Adams Mariana S. Miller Margaret E. Jones Mary Nicholls

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"Longmead" - 12 mo. 6th, 1912

The 686th meeting of the Association was held at "Longmead" on 12th mo 6th 1912.

A beautiful luncheon was served by Lizzie Willson, Mary Muncaster and Anna and Eliza Canby, after which in the absence of Mary Bentley Thomas, Sarah J. Miller kindly consented to preside, and called the mtg to order.

Mary E. Thomas was asked to serve as Secy pro tem and she read the minutes of the last meeting, at Roslyn, (which with slight correction were approved) and then, those of the meeting held at this place 1-5-1911.

Sarah H. Willson as hostess, was called on first and responded with the following sentiment, good for "EveryDay": "Write it in your heart that every day is the best day in the year. No man has learned anything rightly until he knows that every day is doomsday." - Emerson

Sarah also read this extract of wisdom from the essay of a little girl: "Men are what women marry. They drink and smoke and swear, but don't go to church. Perhaps if they wore bonnets they would. They are more logical than women and also more zoological. Both men and women spring from monkeys, but the women spring further than the men."

Ellen Farquhar followed with an estimable article from the Rural New Yorkers on "The Child" which the Hope Farm man believes in, and believes in giving a chance; another selection from the same excellent paper was to the effect that those who cannot bring good cheer had better tarry a while until they can drop their own burdens for a time and so be better fitted to lighten the load of others, sick or in distress.

For fear of shocking the Asso. Lizzie Willson hesitated to give a little girls original prayer which proved only amusing.

Mary E. Gilpin read "Opportunities in One

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Home" which are "often overlooked and seldom appreciated" and East or West, far or near there will never be for us wider opportunities, nobler responsibilities, than lie right in our hands at home."

Eliza N. Moore spoke of and highly recommended "The Promised Land" by Mary Antin, and read an article likewise. "A Study of the Immigrant," by Edw'd A. Steiner, whose personal experiences in the steerage were most graphic, convincing and appealing.

Sarah Willson read from Anna G. Lea "One Who Waits," the "one" being the woman in the case whose patience is often overtaxed, but who seems doomed to endless waiting.

Emma Bond told of the splendid work Judge Landis of Chicago is doing in finding jobs for ex convicts, dozens of whom he has helped in this way.

Estelle T. Moore read the prediction of some scientist, who says "the girls of the future will be bald" - the fearful consequence of being "almost equal to men in attainments." "Baldness, he says, is a sign of intellectual powers and advancement of civilization."

Helen Stabler's selection was on the subject of domestic economy which set forth the importance of reducing household work and management to a system and science, especially along lines of dietetics and sanitation.

Helen Stabler also read the following "I sorrowed that the golden day was dead It's light no more the countryside adorning, But while I grieved behold the East was red with morning. I mourned because the daffodils were killed By burning skies that scorched my early posies But while for these I pined, my hand was filled with roses. " (Author unknown)

Louisa T. Brooke read some very telling "words" by the Ex Gov. of Ind., which was a plea for better born children.

Mary E. Thomas brought a Baldwin dress to show the Asso., and Sarah Willson kindly

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(Longmead con) Magnolia 1-31-1913

exhibited it by putting it on. With two snaps, the dress fastened complete, and was neat as well. A potential garment made by a big mfg. concern at Mt. Holyoke, Mass. and to be had in various sizes and materials at $2.00 a dress.

Emilie J. Massey's, Sallie Randolph Janney and Lizzie Willsons offerings were in lighter vein well balancing out with wisdom, and contributing much to the entertainment of the afternoon.

The mtg. adjourned to Magnolia early in the New Year.

Mary E. Thomas, Secy pro tem

Magnolia 1 31-1913

A stormy morning was followed by bright sunshine just before noon, so nearly all the members who were in the neighbourhood assembled in the bright living room of Mary T. Bond. Ellen Farquhar, Eliza N. Moore, Alice Tyson, Eliz. C. Davis and Sallie Randolph Janney were absentees.

Guests, - Hannah B. Stabler, Emma T. Stabler, Florence S. Bond, Ella Hartshorne, Kath. D. Thomas Mrs. Loveland, Mary Scott, Miss Covington, Helen L. Thomas and Mrs. Laura Jackson.

The sentiment of our hostess was, "Let your strivings be after contentment. Get out of each day all the sweetness there is in it. Live in the present hour as much as possible, and if you live for character, Your foundations will outlast tomorrow."

Estelle T. Moore introduced us to a very primitive part of our country under the heading "Where Americans Live." Off the coast of Louisiana is a small island, in the Gulf, which was settled by the expatriated French of Acadia where "Evangeline" was supposed to have lived. These exiles named their new home "Grand Isle" and thither

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came as years passed, both Indians and pirates, settled there and gradually intermarried with the French. Few visitors ever make their way to this lonely spot, where it is hard to tell when land ceases and water begins, but the inhabitants are kindly & hospitable, the soil is rich, climate mild, and fish and game abound, so, if there is a lack of excitement, peace and plenty are found.

Estelle's second collection was upon the importance of keeping ones heart alive, "the tenderity of advancing years is to narrow and contract the feelings, not that we need to form a new friendship every day, but let us look for and find out all that is amiable and loving in those near us and make the most of it. Though it fall short of former dreams it is better than nothing and serves to keep the heart and mind in exercise."

Sarah E. Kirk thought her offering was too long but several said she was welcome to the time they would have had, so she gave most effectively a dramatic story "Jack Candles of the Police Force."

Martha Holland had a few sentences upon the need of tenderness, a grace that should be cultivated. "Harsh measures never yet won a soul to higher things. Twas tenderness modulates the voice and illumines the face. Mary Scott, who had experienced the delight of a trip to Europe last summer, gave us an interesting acct. of her stay in Vichy, one of the most renowned watering places in the world, and the fame of the Vichy water is spread everywhere. She enjoyed the beauty of the scenery, and found Lake Geneva also entrancing. Only once were she and her daughter inconvenienced by their inability to speak French, and then they nearly took the wrong train and were soon flying back to their hotel in a taxicab.

Albina O Stabler had some excellent thoughts

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