Page 33

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Princess1 at Apr 10, 2022 05:59 PM

Page 33

(Brooke Meadow, con) 31

your closets and attic at least every autumn
and give away everything that can be used by
the poor around you, at once. Do not deceive
yourself by thinking you are practising economy
and thrift by the opposite course.

Catherine Janney's selection from an unknown
letter writer to "The Sun" was a plea for reason
in choosing a life partner. Love was merely a physical
disorder, not considered nearly so important
as congeniality. Perhaps sober middle age
may be induced to adopt such counsel, but we hope
there will be many youth and maidens, for all
time, who will not calculate so cooly.

Emilie T. Massey read of a garden near
Washington owned and cultivated by the Private
Sec'y. of Sec'y. Houston, Robt. M.Reese. He is said
to be an expert upon the subjects of soils and crops
and that he is filling a difficult situation admirably
goes without saying. The numbers of
letters requiring answers is immense and each
received a courteous reply.

Margaret G. T. Moore gave from "The Farm
Journal" an essay by Jacob Biggle comparing
old times with the present. He thought the
only advantage his grandparents had was
that their wants were simpler. The men and
women of Colonial days loved and were loved,
had the joys of children and friendship, and
were stirred by the identical impulses of 20th century
man and women who have not become so blase
they will not show emotions of any kind. What
we see around us is fair to look upon and if
we only do our own part, Providence, or whosoever
we may call the hand which guides the universe,
will see to it that all things are added unto
us. Anna G. Lea entertained us with an
acct. of a recent trip she and her husband
had taken to N. J. Especially were they pleased
with an excursion to Princeton, where we believe
very few Sandy Spring natives have ever wandered.

The beautiful landscape effects were a revelation
to the visitors Andrew Carnegie has just
given a large lake to the Univ. at a cost of $3,000,000.

Thos. J. Lea also inspected an English gamekeeper's

Page 33

(Brooke Meadow, con) 31

your closets and attic at least every autumn
and give away everything that can be used by
the poor around you, at once. Do not deceive
yourself by thinking you are practising economy
and thrift by the opposite course.

Catherine Janney's selection from an unknown
letter writer to "The Sun" was a plea for reason
in choosing a life partner. Love was merely a physical
disorder, not considered nearly so important
as congeniality. Perhaps sober middle age
may be induced to adopt such counsel, but we hope
there will be many youth and maidens, for all
time, who will not calculate so cooly.

Emilie T. Massey read of a garden near
Washington owned and cultivated by the Private
Sec'y. of Sec'y. Houston, Robt. M.Reese. He is said
to be an expert upon the subjects of soils and crops
and that he is filling a difficult situation admirably
goes without saying. The numbers of
letters requiring answers is immense and each
received a courteous reply.

Margaret G. T. Moore gave from "The Farm
Journal" an essay by Jacob Biggle comparing
old times with the present. He thought the
only advantage his grandparents had was
that their wants were simpler. The men and
women of Colonial days loved and were loved,
had the joys of children and friendship, and
were stirred by the identical impulses of 20th century
man and women who have not become so blase
they will not show emotions of any kind. What
we see around us is fair to look upon and if
we only do our own part, Providence, or whosoever
we may call the hand which guides the universe,
will see to it that all things are added unto
us. Anna G. Lea entertained us with an
acct. of a recent trip she and her husband
had taken to N. J. Especially were they pleased
with an excursion to Princeton, where we believe
very few Sandy Spring natives have ever wandered.

The beautiful landscape effects were a revelation
to the visitors Andrew Carnegie has just
given a large lake to the Univ. at a cost of $3,000,000.

Thos. J. Lea also inspected an English gamekeeper's