Club Minutes: Horticultural Society, 1927

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Knowlton

April,5,1927.

On October fifteenth, the Horticultural met at Edgewood-nothing more need really be said about what a delightful neeting we had-for to all of us Edgewood is synonimous with beautiful surround ings and gracious hospitality.

After luncheon the meeting was called to order by our President,Mr. Brooke. The Minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read.The selected articles were then called for. CousinHelen Hallowell read for Mr. A. G. Thomas an article on ferns by Dr. Stile of Millwakee. One bit of information well to remember, is that the Boston fern is the hardiest of house ferns.

Miss. Mary Brooke had her House-guest read for her an article which particularry appealed to us. It told of Main, Iowa, and Kentucky all havforbidden the unsightly Bill Boards being erected on their main highways.

Mrs. Shackleford, and Edgewood guest, form Kentucky gave us an old Kentucky receipt for cooking a ham... Soak for a day, put into a large lardcan, cover with water, put in six large winter apples, skin and all, one pound of brown sugar, three pods of red pepper; let steam for fourteen hours, skin and bake as always.

Forethought told us to keep fighting weeds, The way to propogate dogwood is to gather the red berries, mash, dry and plant, about one inch deep.

The assistant Secretary reported very fine displays-a very lovelu basket of flowers which Mrs. Hagerman, a guest brought, came in for it's share of admiration.

Last edit 4 months ago by mbrockway
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Voted unanimously to change the day back to the first tuesday of each month.

Mrs. Hagerman has shown a desire to become a mem ber of The Horticultural-Her written applicatin was given to the Sec'y and Her name will be voted upon at the April meeting. Application for member ship from Mr. & Mrs. Harry Stabler was also read. and a great deal of pleasure expressed at their de sire to join us. Their names will also be voted on at the April meeting.

QUESTIONS

Roses may be moved in October. cut out all old wood from rasberries.

"A well ventalated cellar, cut off from the heat, is the best home cold-storage for apples.

Cats are the best rat-exterminators known to the Horticultoral."

A word of remembrance was spoken for a dear, hospitable, former member of our Society - Mrs. Louisa Nesbit, who passed away the fire of the week.

And so another Horticultural Year has ended, on a most perfect fall day, with APPLES, APPLES everywhere, and all you want to eat.

We will meet again next yeat, on our old familiar first Tuesday - May our circle be unbroken.

Mary Reading Nichols, Mary Reading Nichols, Secretary.

Last edit 4 months ago by mbrockway
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With the blossoming of the flowers and the return of the birds comes a new sense of our loss of one whose spirit, even in the late autumn of life, was ever full of the zest and vigor of springtime. Ellen Farquhar, a life-long member of this society, was not only a horticulturalist of wide knowledge and unusual skill, but an individual whose personality consistently exemplified the great principle of growth inherent in the seeds and plants she loved to work with. Of her it could never be said that she had settled down into a quiet and placid old age; her keen mind, her many enthusiasms, her few strong antagonisms, and, above all, her great love for and interest in people kept her active in the currents of life that moved about her and in the world at large. She never claimed the priveleges of old age, and old age passed her by.

Always she loved the out-of-door world, and lived close to nature as few peopele do. As a teacher she created in many of her pupils an interest in Botany which has persisted until the present. When se retired from her profession she gave much of her time to the raising of vegetables and flowers at The Cedars, and in her contacts with her friends, as well as through this organization, was a center of helpful advice for those less skilled in gardening. Many people in the neighborhood cherish plants which "Cousin Ellen" - always the most generous of persons - has given to them. Rising at dawn and eating a frugal breakfast, she would go promptly into her garden, and there on most fine days and on many not so fine might be found with hoe or spade or shears.

Last edit 4 months ago by mbrockway
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Yet the work in hand was never so pressing that she did not seem ready and glad to leave it when visitors arrived. This adaptability to circumstances was an outstanding characteristic, and was not an evidence of an easy-going nature but of a life well-ordered and efficient. She was an ardent advocate of peace, and her daily and hourly existence bore testimony to her principle.

It has been mentioned that she was an enthusiastic pereson. In the list of her enthusiasms little children, flowers and her friends come easily first: but at ninety years of age she also enjoyed to the fullest such secondary things as travel, books, a bit of beautiful lace bought at a European shop, walking, a wonderful view, riding at great speed in an automobile, certain particulalrly good foods, lovely colors and perfumes, and many other items usually held to be appreciated exclusively by youthful people. Her sense of humor was unfailing, her sympathy abounding. Of her it could be said with literal truth that she rejoiced with those who rejoiced and wept with those who wept. Perhaps the glory of a life like hers can be most fittingly summed up in these two words: "She loved."

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Falling Green

May, 3d, 1927.

On Tuesday April Fifth, THE HORTICUL TURAL SOCIETY of Sandy Spring started its Sixtyfourth year. We met at Knowlton, when Ethel McKay upheld the reputation so well known to us, of gracious hospitality. We are so pleased that she wants to belong to us, and we all enjoyed amost delightful meeting with her.

Our Cousin Ellen has left us since last we met, and never has her loss been felt so keenly as on this day, She loved the Horticultural, and was an inspiration to all of us. Gladys B. Tumbleson, expressed most beautifully, our love and sorrow in a mem orial which Cousin Corrie read in a very charming way. A copy of this memorial has been put into this book preceding these minutes.

The minutes of the October meeting were then read and adopted. Mrs. Nesbit then read for Cousin Helen Hallowell an article discribing the three story garden. In this wonder garden things are planted so closly, allowing tall vegetab les which require sun to shade lower ones which like less sunect., that everything just grows except weeds which are chocked out. Thtis sounds very much like a fairy tale Our weeds just wouldn't choke I'm sure.

Mother read us what John Bouroughs had to say of apples, a very good article, read at a very appropriate time, for I'm afraid we don't think as much of apples as we once did, before this last fall and winter of apples in the "fifty-seven var eities.

The poultry roll-call showed that we have 172 chickens, 51 more than we had last April,

Last edit 4 months ago by mbrockway
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