Letter: Henry C. Hallowell to Sarah Miller Hallowell, February 23, 1870

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No 8

Rockland 2 mo 23rd 1870 Fourth Day Evening.

Dear S, I am afraid this will be a poor return for the pleasure thy letters give us, for I have been "on the go" all day, had no nap, am just through hearing the childrens lessons, and feel generally tired and uninteresting. After closing my letter yesterday aft. and just before I started to [Lynden??], [Sister?], Nancy & Madge walked in. They were very agreeable, and Nancy accepted an invitation to stay all night. I had a little fire made in the front room, as well as in ours and put Henry & Frank over there, Robt. in the Crib, Cornelia with me, and Edith by herself in the Trundle Bed. We had another good night, and a [real?] first rate breakfast at very little after 7.. oclk. Frank went to school & does not seem any the worse for it. After breakfast I [started?] the men over to the Dam and soon followed after but found the ice so "rotten" (inelegant but correct and expressive) and so difficult to land that we only got one load. I find the house is 3/4 full and keeping nicely. This load more than replaces what was melted, and the house is so large that I think we will get through the summer. Alban Gilpin has been very busy all day and will get his house full. He had

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a large force at work and pushed it out all around the Dam, wherever he could. I lent him my cart this afternoon. I am sorry it is not better ice.

Cousin George Brooke is quite unwell from cold. Miss [Porce?] and Charles B. went to the "Ball" (in aid of the Brookville Academy) last night, but did not enjoy it much, as some of the Gentlemen (?) got "uproarious" at supper. I went to Mtg. and then home to a good dinner (I mention this, that thy mind may be easy as D our "inner man" (and woman) about which thee is some times anxious), and after dinner at the request of Ana Stabler went to [N. Y.??] to attend the Mtg. in behalf of the Ashton & Bonds Mill Turnpike. About 20 persons were present, and $ 100 subscribed. I took two shares ($50.00) as it is an important road for wheat growers and I have bothered others so much about roads that I had not the moral courage to decline. The time of payment extends through two years. It will require $30,000 and $21,000 are now subscribed, besides about $2000 subscribed in work. They go to Annapolis next week to get a Charter. Warwick and Ben were there, & reported all well. W. said he had sent to Beltsville for Mary. When is Annie coming? I called to see Uncle Wm. who is not very well. He and Aunt Mgt. seemed glad to hear that thee was enjoying thyself. I called at [?Harriet?] & delivered thy messages. Kate seems to think a good deal of thee, as in

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deed every body does. I begin to feel as if thee was entirely too good for me, and at Stanmore this aft. They almost told me so. Uncle Wm. says tell thee that he intends to watch whether I go down towards Mrs Mackalls often! I have been at home every evening and to every meal since thee left us. Indeed if thee remains away many months longer, I shall become quite a family man and prepared to let thee go to Congress or be a Judge. The children are very good and interesting & Robt. is lovely when he is behaving himself, which is part of the time. Sometimes he is less tractable than at others. Bridget sends much love and says "dont worry about home, because every body is having an easy enough time". She has just brought in Franks overcoat beautifully mended. The Kitchen Girls continue Paragons as far as I hear or know to the contrary. They seem pleased at receiving thy messages. Amelia was here yesterday and I expect that the ironing is done !!! To think of that terrible job being over for another whole week? In thy Utopia there will be neither meals nor ironing days. Arnold returned from town tonight having need $1.15 for Timothy hay. He seem to be well again. I know if nothing new, makes it is a Report that Maria Weaver was married but some think it was not "our" Maria --

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I infer from thy letters that thee is having quite as good a time as thee expected. Thee does not say a word about coming home. When does thee expect to return? Father H. goes down tomorrow to return on [??]day, but will be engaged in the evening and cannot get to Alexa. Will there be room for me? Why do they want to know when I am coming? Will it interfere with M. A's visit? I should like to see her. I am sorry thy teeth are not being attended to. We ought to have written to Dr. D. Has thee heard Mrs. Adams sing? I hope Eliza will invite her round when I come. I like her singing better than Mrs. McC's.

To-morrow will be thy Birth-Day !! I wonder if people that are able to give their wives presents really love them any more than our poor _____s who cannot? How would it feel to be able to hand thee a silk dress or a good watch; or some other thing thee wants and needs? Well! We are not to remain here forever & in a couple of thousand years the dress would be moth eaten and the watch not running. Kindness and [gentle??]ness and consideration however bear fruits that are perennial. May I ever, more and more, be able to lay these upon thy alter on each returning day while spared to enjoy thy true gooodness & womanly worth. Such woman as thee are not found often in this curious world, and such a fine as sainted Mother M. has raised, (??) bless poor human kind. I must leave a time for morning. Goodnight and Pleasant dreams!

24th. The morning dawns beautifully on thy BirthDay, all well and bright. The children have been talking a good deal about thee and are going to celebrate the occasion of being as good as possible. Love from all to all. Affte.

H. C. H.

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