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February 2 1915 [printed letterhead] Telephone, [printed letterhead] 313 Kensington. [printed letterhead] 7, Cheyne Walk, [printed letterhead] Chelsea, [printed letterhead] London, S.W.

Dearest Mary,

I am indeed grateful for the pots of apple syrup, safely delivered here yesterday. I thought it a most acceptable condiment at my last (very enjoyable) visit

Last edit about 3 years ago by Stephen
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to Ockham.

I am glad you were interested in that small (yet not badly put together) biography of Lord Bute. His reputation has suffered unjustly from the fact that so many XIX century historians have

Last edit about 3 years ago by Stephen
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been content to accept as gospel everything that was said or written by creatures such as John Wilkes or Horace Walpole. I want you to paste or otherwise fix inside your copy of Lovat Fraser's Life of Lord Bute the enclosed cutting from a Spectator of 12 years ago which by permission of St. Loe Strachey I have been

Last edit about 3 years ago by Stephen
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able to hunt up & bring away. It covers a point of great importance & five clues to matter & authorities (on the Peace of 1763) that were not known to Lov. Fraser.

I find that St. Loe Strachey is himself much possessed with the idea that Fredk the Great in what he said of Lord Bute shewed him -self a fit example to the liars of modern Prussia.

Ys. vy A

CB Stuart Wortley

Last edit 6 months ago by ubuchan
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[printed cutting from The Spectator (Jan 31, 1903, p. 177) of a letter to the Editor: only the letter marked by Buchan with Xs is transcribed - the preceding text is not]

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

GERMANY AND BRITAIN.

(TO THE EDITOR OF THE "SPECTATOR.")

SIR,- "Vigilans sed AEquus" in his important summary of the causes of enmity between Germany and Great Britain in your issue December 20th dates their origin so far back as the Seven Years' War, on which occasion, he declares, the Prussian grieviance against England was a real one; and he quotes a still stronger statement from the Times, in which the reviewer of Mr. George Peel's book, "The Enemies of England," speaks of Lord Bute's abandonment of Frederick the Great (the alleged grievance) as worse

Last edit about 3 years ago by ubuchan
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