Farfel Research Notebooks

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Farfel Notebook 01: Leaves 001-064

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BV 173 D 28 P. 80 - 1972 JG Davies (Stanford Ref.) A. The mass 1) The sacramentary - the celebrants book. 2) antiphonal misarum - contained all the sung proportions of both the offices + the mass. The material to be used in celebrating the eucharist was called the antiphon missarum or graduale. Medieval + Roman Catholic 3) The lectionary - contained the apistles + gospels read at mass 4) The missal - a book which resulted from fusion of the above 3. B. The divine office 1) The psalter - a distribution of the psalms for liturgical use over a period of a week or according to feasts 2) The sntiphonal - Contained the antiphons + responds of the divine office *75 3) The hymnal - the collection of hymns used at the celebration of the office 4) The breviary (fusion of 1-3.)

Late in the 1st greater of the quarter of the 11th C, a stave of 3 or 4 lines (2 black, with yellow + with red) was invented + propagated by the Benedictine monk, Guido of Arezzo. Stave of 4 lines of the same color, either red or black were used in the early polyphonic settings where they were reserved for the Tenor, ie. The voice which sung the Gregorian melody. Shortly after the middle fo the 13th C. the stave was adapted in the liturgical books of the friars + in the origin of the modern stave. Neumes - derive from Greek accents + show the rise + fall in pitch of the melody. Neumes are found in manuscripts from the 8th to the 13th C, when they were replaced by stave notation. The attempts at expressing the intervals of a melody required that the neumes should be carefully placed + consequently,

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- In the Book of Durrow, St John's symbol is not the usual Eagle but, following the pre-Jerome order, the lion.

- Although before the end of the 15th C Bibles had been printed in German, Italian, French, Dutch, Danish, Bohemian + Spanish, England was sitll without a printed Bible in the Tongue of the people. Caxton could not have printed one for in 1414 a law was enacted that all person found reading the Scriptures in the mother Tongue shold 'forfeit lant, atel, lif + goods from their heyres for ever.

The excellence of Coverdale's work lies in its literary quality from the point of view of English usage, rather than in its textual bases or translational accuracy. ("a translation from translations")

The provenance of the 1535 Coverdale Bible remains still a matter of mystery.

The main biblical text of the Coverdale edition 1535 was divided into 6 main sections: Pentateuch, Historical Books, Hagiographa (poetical books) Prophets, Apocrypha, New Testament. woodcut illustrations appear in the text comprising 68 different instances in a total of some 158 places.

1535 - Bible - the generall title is accepted as Holbeun's design. The smaller cuts (67) by repetition over 150 reappear in Nicolson's folios of 1537 + Day + Seres' reprint of the Matthew Bible of 1549.

James Nicholson (1535-38) address: Southward St. Thomas Hospital although he was known to be alive a a considerably later date, no book was printed by him after 1538.

1537 Coverdale Bible (J. Nicholson) - 1st ed of the whole English Bible to be printed in England. Tyndale's New Testament had been printed the previous year by a london printed named Thomas Godfrey.

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61 Feb. '77 Rosenthal $35

Livre d' Henres - French (235x160mm) (1515-30) printed on Vellum Paris c. 1515 - [inserted] in French [end inserted] Almanack with Calendar on Veras

p. 273 S.T.C. C. 29 R. 22.

P. Lacombe - Z7838 H6 L2 -2nd page #263 Henres a l'usage de Romevers 1515 sons la marque des Handonin (le centare Nessus) Fol. A2: Almanach pan 1515-1530 imprimés a Paris pan Gillet Handonyn, demonant au bout de pont Nostre Dame, want Sainct Denis de la Chantre, a l'enseigne de la Rollae d'or.

In 4^o Goth. Les grandes figures en couleurs Sur velin. Bibl. Nationale - Velins 1518. --> {does not correspond to this page 5/98 88 feuillets en 11 cahiers signés A-L par 8 30 lignes. Cf. Brunet, Heures, nos 245, 246, et add., col. 1687, n^o 246 bio - Catalogue de la libn. Th. Belin, 1906 n^o 75. Brunet, P.C. - Manuel de librarie, Paris, Vol. 5 p. 1629 Z1011 B89 Ret. or P1638 #251 #245 - Heures a lusaige de Romme Jout au long sens nien nequenin in 4' Goth. - encadnements et grandes planches sur bois - un exemplaire sur Vélin, avec les figures peintes et rehaussées d'or, niche reliure francaise ancienne en manoquin.

P. Lacombo #265 Gillet Handouin In - 4^o Goth, Fig en noir (not velins) A2 A/manach pour 1515-30 10v fenillets en 14 cahiers 28 lines de texte signia A-M per 8 et A par 4 Bibl de l'Ecole des Beaux Arts G.I. 17. #262 - Guillaume Godard - IN 4' Goth. #275 - Simon Vostre - In 4' Goth.

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Paris, Gillet Hardouyn - large device of the Hardounis viz. Hercules rescuing Deianuce from centaur Hessus. - at border calendar (mine) same as a border from (8 2/8 x 5 1/4) #270 (1509) C. F. Murray --> Z 240 M97 - elaborate borders composed of Renaissance ornament interspersed with children playing, figures of saints, hunting scenes, etc. - boys playing amidst foliage, dance of death - Germain Handouin (son or brother of Gillet) - Les Heures published by Gillet and Germain Hardouin existent en aussi grand nombre que calles de Kenver mais nous les jugeons in [illegible] a as dennieres with surtout a cellus de Vostre - Gillet --> 1497, 1509-1521 (un bout de pon) Notre Dame) aftu 1521 --> Germain. Germain Handouin - Paris worked about 1500-1541. Gillet Hardouin - Paris worked about 1491-1521.

Hind History of Woodcut p 696 A.W. Pollard

- family of Hardouin - taken earliest Horae being used in 1504/5 - printed by Antoine Chappid for Gillet Hurdoim with woodcut surface 7 1/2 x 4 3/4" - Gillet Hardouin - who wiht his successors was responsible for some 70 editions during the first half of the 16th C. Horae - Calendars - of the moveable feasts - all that those calendars show is that the edition in which they occur must have been printed before, probably at least 5 or 6 years before, the last year for which they are reckoned. - the brothers Germain and Gilus Hardouim produced [illegible] as many examples as Vostre and Pigouchet - they are characterized by the frequent use of hand colouring in the woodcuts in imitation of manuscript Book of Ours.

R.L. Poole - Medieval Reckonings of Time London 1921

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Philippe Pigouchet Guillaume Eustace Simon Vostre Guillaume Godard Nicole Costre Francois Regnault Antoine Verard Geofrey Tory et ses successeurs Jean du Pre Thielman Kerver Les Hardouyn

A.W. Pollard - each of the Hours had its mystical refernce to some event in the lives of the Blessed Virgin + our Lord. Lands - referred to the visit of Mary to Elizabeth Prime - to the Nativity Turice - to the Angel's Message to the Shepherds Sext - to the Adoration of the Magi Nones - ot the Circumcision Visper - to the Flight into Egupt Compline - to the Assumption of the Virgin

- both wood and copper were employed in engraving different editions of these designs. (borders etc.) - Gunst Z 239.9 K45C3 Price Case - 1524 - Heured de Romme - T. Kerver - Calendars (MS) The major saints + the great feasts of the Church are of course universal; these days are entered in color + give us the phrase 'red letter days.'

The Dominical Letter - Dionysus Exiquus, a Seythian Monk in the year 532 introduced the system of dating from the Incarnation of our Lord, now written Anno Domini The 7 days of the week were indicated by A-G which were fixed to the days of the year, in a constantly recurring order beginning with letter A for the 1st of Jan. Thus in a year beginning with Sunday on the 1st of Jan the letter A would be the Dominical letter.

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62 April 77 Rosenthal $27.50

Bible - French - early 13th C (C 1240) folio. 182 - Very small Gothic minususcule sometimes called "Pearl Gothic." - written in France about 1250 in a very small neat Gothic minuscule which seems to have been developed for small format Bibles. Ruled with a stylus.

Otto Ege leaf from a 12th C. Manuscript Bible - this century surpassed all others for the beautiful writing found in its manuscripts. It has been noted, however, that the more beautiful a MSS becomes in its characters, the less accurate in its Latinity. SOme writings of the Benedictines during this centyr, are almost unintelligible because of their barbarous Latin.

*Miniature MSS Bible circa 1240 AP #62 et sign crossed - Paris this period The Latin Vulgate version usually attributed to St. Jerome is here executed in angular Gothic script, 11 lines to the inch, on finest vellum. These small protable Bible were produced in great numbers by the Dominicians (1250-1275) in the early days of the Sorbonne, It has been calculated that in the year 1250, it would have taken the earnings of a day laborer for 15 yrs to purchase a MSS Bible of this type.

Paris MSS Bible circa 1310 see #42 Written in Gothic script 7 lines to the inch. The calligraphy + ornamentation on this page deserve class inspection. This form of writing is in marked contrast to the minute, much abbreviated + angular text of the preceding Century.

13th C - the inks used in Italy + France in this period frequently had a decided brown hue, while those used in England had a green tone.

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Book of Sirach - extols wisdom + ethical conduct. - this long book (51 chapters) forms part of the OT Wisdom literature - one of the few books of the OT to give the name of its author, The Latin title of the book is Ecclesiasticus. Sirach, a professional s scribe i.e. wise man composed his books for "every seeker after wisdom." Sirach wrote his book in Hebrew c. 180 BC. The Durtero canonical Book of Sirach was omitted from the Jewish (hense also from the Protestant) Canon, most likely because of the sectarienism of the Pharisees at the Synod of Jemnia c. AD 95. Sirach is a collection of poems praising wisdom + a kind of handbook of moral theology. It what a pious Jew of the 2nd C. BC believed + how he acted.

44.1 - 50.21 - Prais of Fathers [inserted] the longest sustained theme in the book is the celebrated section on the Praise of Famous Men. [end inserted] 49 Josiah + the Prophets 46 Joshua, Cabeb + The Judges 50 Simon, Son of Jochanan 47 Nathan, David + Solomon 48 Elijah + Elisha

Vulgate Bia. Ecclesiastes. Canticum Ecclesiastes ( or the O.T. Preacher) Canticorum Song of Songs Sapientia Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) Sirach seu Ecclesiasticus Isaiah Isaias (liber Iesu Filii Serach

Sirach - father of the authro of Ecclesiasticus, which is sometimes called Sirach Ben Sira is Hebrew for 'son of Sirach'

Not unalike the Paresian university hand was the minature writing used in the innumerable "packet" Bibles written in the 15th C in response to the recieved interest in the Scriptures that was brought about by the teaching of the new orders of friars. (Ency. Brit.)

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Apocrypha - a nuclus of 14 or 15documents written during the last 2 centuries before Christ + the 1st C of the Chrisian era. Old Testament - 39 books New Testament - 27 books In 1546 the Roamn Church officially declared Tobit, Judith, Wisdom, Ecclesiasticus, Baruch, I + II Maccabees, + certain supplementary parts of Esther + David to be inspired + on a par with the books of the Old Testament, among wich these are interspersed. Some Catholic scholars have designated these desputed books as dustero canonical, meaning thereby books accepted as canonical at a later date than the others, which are turned protocanonical. It is usual among Roman Catholics to apply the term Apocrypha to the books which others commonly designate Pseudepigraphs.

-Coverdale had the Apocrypha en bloc between the Testaments except Baruch which he places after Jeremiah. - The apocryphal books are the weakest part of the Authorized Verison.

p. 22 Great Books + Collectors Aung. Thomas THe 1st manuscritps to have survived in any quantity are the Bibles written - esp. in France during the 100 yrs following 1175. The strong hand of Philip Augustus (1180-1223) had affected a aonsiderable degree of security in France enabling the arts to flourish. WIth the reign of St. Louis (1226-70) intellectual leadership moved from the monasteries to the universities where the friars, especially the Dominicans played a great part. St. Louis gathered an important theological library in the treasury of the St. Chapelle, remarking that a church without books was like an army without weapons. Manuscript production now passed mainly to commerical workshops which were to be found near the universities in Paris + elsewhere.

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Book I comprises religion, omens, prodigies Book II social customs Books III-IV virtuous conduct (fortitude, moderation, humanity etc.) Books VII + VIII good fortune, military stratagems, famous law suits, eloquence etc Book IX evil conduct. V. Maximus - the Latin author of a book of historical anecdotes -- was intended for use in schools of rhetoric - the anecdotes are drawn chiefly from Roman history as well as the Greeks. -- Editio Princepa - Strossburg, Johann Mentelin, not after 1470. one of the few classical authors to be first issued by a German press. -- the best existing codex is a ninth Century manuscript of Berne. -- a collection of historical anecdotes intended for the teaching of rhetoric. All that we know of the author's life is that he accompanied Ovid's friend Sextus Pompey to his governorship of Asia about 27AD. Adulation is heaped upon Tiberius throughout, + the violent denunciation of Sejanus in the last book suggests that the work was published soon after Sejanus' fall in 31. The anecdotes for the use of speakers of which the book consists are classified under various moral or philosophical headings (omens, moderation, gratitude, chastity, cruelty + the like) each of these being illustrated from Roman (domestica) + less fully, from foreign (externa) examples. The book's rhetorical artifices, its bombast + its sententiousness illustrate the excesses of the Silver Age. Valerius himself has nothing to say worth hearing. But he knew his market, + his work enjoyed a vogue in antiquity + the Middle Ages. It was twice epitomized, in the 4th + 5th C. Types 113R text type In use in 1490, 1491 78R text _ commentary type. In use 1490, 91, 93 (?) 78GR lower case only. In use 1490, 91. HEHL {no rubrication except 1st letter each book - total of 9 books. (98567) {Prologus {Li. I begins on V my leaf XI b3 ends on XXVIII X misnumbered XI also.

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(57) S.F. Book Fair Charles W. Traylen Sept. '76 $5.00

Tiberius Catius Asconius a Cohaul under Nero. (25 or 26-101)

Silvius Italicus Punica. (Petrus Marsus d. 1512, commentary) Venice: Bonetus Locatellus, for Octavianus Scotus 18 May 1492 f° (c iiii) 1991/$2500 Goff S508 HC 14740 BMC V p 439 Latin cop HEHL, Yale.

156 leaves. 5a:61 lines of commentary surrounding the text, + headline, 242 (249) x 166 mm. Types: 105R; 80R woodcut capitals

The 1st known book of Locotellus is the Augustine of 9 Feb 1486/7 printed for O. Scotus, for whom he continued to work almost exclusively till Scotus's death on Christmas Eve, 1498. Subsequently he worked for the heirs of Scotus + others, + his press was active throughout the 1st decade of the 16th C.

Latin epic poet - author of a long epic entitled Punica - an account in hexameter verse to the 2nd war of the Romans against the Cathaginians (218-201 BC) (War of Hannibal) Punica - the longest epic in Latin literature - comprising 17 books + over 12,000 lines - it deals c the 2nd only of the Punic wars - describes all the 6 great battles of the war - there were 2 editiones principes (1471.)

Octavianus Scotus, a citizen of Monza (near Milan) was an enterprising publisher. It has often been doubted whether he even had a printing office of his own, although his name alone as printer is to be found in a great many books. From 1486 certainly Bonetus Locatellus was his printer, + the books which bear Scotus' name alone are to be ascribed to Locatellus -- Bonetus Locatellus is the printer whose name appears most often in Venetian books towards the end of the 15th C, c a total of 144 editions to his credit. He began printing in 1478 + became the printer to the publishing firm of Ottaviano Scotto.

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