Farfel Research Notebooks

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Farfel Notebook 01: Leaves 001-064

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example(56)B S.F. Book Fair Charles W. Traylen Sept. '76 $5.00

Valerius Maximus, Gaius (fl. c. AD20) (c. 49 B.C.-c. 30 AD) Factorum ac Dictiorum Memorabiluim liber ad Tyberium Caesarem (Facta et dicta memorabilia) c the commentary of Oliverius Arzignanenois Venia: Guilelmus Anima Mia, Tridinensis Latin 12 Aug. 1491 f° Liber I-XI b3 Goff V39 HC 15791 Pr 5114 BMC V p 412 cop HEHL, Yale, Harv. C.L. {of Piancerto + Trino in the Duchy of Montferrat.

244 leaves, 5-244 numbered I-CCXL 64 lines of commentary surrounding the text, + headline, 245 (252) x 150 mm Types 113R.; 78R.; 78 Gk. Marginalia. Woodcut capitals, also spaces, c guide letters Only ed. by this printer. Having first appeared as the partner of Antonello di Burasconi in an Aquinas of 31 May 1485, Anima Mia is found printing alone on 11 Aug. 1486, + so continues until Nov 1491. Subsequent books containing his name date from 1493, 4 + 99.

"Nine books of memorable acts + speeches Deeds + Sayings" of the Romans - by Valerius Maximus, a writer in the reign o fTiberius (14-37 AD) see - Kraus Incurabula #148 -- The work is a collection of anectodes drawn from Roman + Greek history, classified by subject, intended as a stock of illustrative examples to be incorporated into orations or rhetorical exercises. Though much of the material is taken from Cicero + Livy, it includes some stories from the author's own time (1st century AD) + is thus an important original source for the reign of Tiberius. It is the 1st extant example of the unctuous melodramatic style of later Latin prose, + its long career as one of the most used text books of the Middle Ages + Renaissance spread + kept alive this style, both in Latin + the vernacular languages. At least 23 editions appeared before 1501 + Schweiger lists 100 editions which appeared from 1501 to 1600. Numerous translations have also been made.

Last edit 2 months ago by elitranscribes
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48 S.F. Book Fair Charles W. Treylen Sept '76 $4.30

Chaucer's Works (1340-1400) about 1545 - Nicholas Hill for Richard Kele - London -1550 S.T.C. 5072 (T. Petit for Kele + others) fol.

The Legend of Good Woman - the legend of Dido. See #106 ccxiii -Chaucer's language is late Middle English of the South East Midland Type. Sale 1982 $1750

Richard Kele (1542-1552.) copies - BM, Bodl. HEHL 11 1/4 x 7 3/4"

3rd collected edition black letter, 2 columns 35, text leaves misnumbered 355.

this ed. was shared, perhaps about equally between 4 london booksellers folio

[with .1545] Robert Toye - London Works Sale 1981 1500L 3rd collected edition. Folio S.T.C. 5074.

1542 ed - 1st in which the Plowman's Tale appears - set entirely in an English blackletter with 1545 - To this ed. different publishers' names are sometimes found in the Clophon: William Bonham, Richard Kele, Roberte Toye, Thomas Petit, + perhaps others, each having his own name alone as printed, in as many copies as were his proper share. Roughly this is a reprint of the 1542 ed, but here the Plowman's Tale is inserted before instead of after the Parson's Tale.

Chaucer's Works - editions 1) 1532 Thynne STC #5068 2) 1542 John Reynes 3) no date 1545 Richard Kele 4) 1561 John Kyngston # STC 5075+6 5) 1598 Thomas Speght (editor) Printed by Adam Islip # STC 5077,8,9.

Thomas Gascoigne - theologian, son + heir of Richard + Beatrix his wife. Doctor of Divinity Oxford - 1434. Throughout his life Gascoigne was an active preacher, vehement in his hostility to the Wycliffite tradition + as unsparing as Wycliffe himself of evils in the church wherever he found them. - principal work - Dictionarium Theologicum, "Written various times between 1434 + 1457 - its contents are mainly of a theological or moral interest - also wrote a brief life of St. Jerome + translated into English a life of St. Bridget of Sweden for the edification of the sisters of Sion. This is probably the life of St. Bridget which was printed without any author's name by Pynson in 1516.

Last edit 6 days ago by Maria the Elder
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The Medieval Literature of Western Europe Ed. by John H. Fisher NY Univ. Press 1966 PN 671 .F5 (West Valley)

Last edit 2 months ago by wilsone5
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The Italian Philosophers - ML#376 I Rennaisance Humanism 1) Francesco Petranca (1304-1374) 2) Leon Battista Alberti (1404-1472) 3) Lorenzo Valla (1406/7-1457) 4) Giarnozzo Manelti (1396-1459) II Rennaisance Platonism 1) Giovanni Pico della Minandola (1463-1494) 2) Mansilio Ficino (1433-1499) 3) Leone Fbreo (1460-1521?) III Renaissance Aristotelianism 1) Pietro Pomponazzi (1462-1525) 2) Torato Tasso (1544-1595) IV The Philosophers of Nature 1) Bunardino Telesio (1509-1588) 2) Tummaso Campandla (1568-1639) 3) Giordano Brurso (1548-1600)

p 303 Vol I E. [?Eisenotein?]

Although the anti-Turkish cursade was the 1st religious movement to make use of print, Protestantism surely was the 1st fully to exploit its potential as a mass medium.

Last edit about 1 month ago by alvoisard
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France con sign (9) used internally. ÷ est (French MSS) (est). ȩ (12th C) i - dotted ? or only if double et sign - long honiz. stroke - characteristic of the Latin South (z) i.e. Spain ampersand & - (Canolingian) [?Tuionian?] sign v forked r - French cursive hands c for cum not common after 1220 n for non de, do, p. juncture which is common in developed gothic crossed [?Tuionian?] et sign 7 -- sometimes regarded as indicative of origin north of the Alps double looped S --> S erect s --> f developed Gothic --> tightly compressed letters becomes shaded 1 (1343) the [inserted] internal [end inserted] omedial 9 sign for con or cum is generally French miniscule [?forked?] r (r) - Typically French

Last edit 12 days ago by alvoisard
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- In the Book of Durrow, St John's symbol is not the usual Eagle but, following the pre-Jerome order, the lion.

- Although before the end of the 15th C Bibles had been printed in German, Italian, French, Dutch, Danish, Bohemian + Spanish, England was sitll without a printed Bible in the Tongue of the people. Caxton could not have printed one for in 1414 a law was enacted that all person found reading the Scriptures in the mother Tongue shold 'forfeit lant, atel, lif + goods from their heyres for ever.

The excellence of Coverdale's work lies in its literary quality from the point of view of English usage, rather than in its textual bases or translational accuracy. ("a translation from translations")

The provenance of the 1535 Coverdale Bible remains still a matter of mystery.

The main biblical text of the Coverdale edition 1535 was divided into 6 main sections: Pentateuch, Historical Books, Hagiographa (poetical books) Prophets, Apocrypha, New Testament. woodcut illustrations appear in the text comprising 68 different instances in a total of some 158 places.

1535 - Bible - the generall title is accepted as Holbeun's design. The smaller cuts (67) by repetition over 150 reappear in Nicolson's folios of 1537 + Day + Seres' reprint of the Matthew Bible of 1549.

James Nicholson (1535-38) address: Southward St. Thomas Hospital although he was known to be alive a a considerably later date, no book was printed by him after 1538.

1537 Coverdale Bible (J. Nicholson) - 1st ed of the whole English Bible to be printed in England. Tyndale's New Testament had been printed the previous year by a london printed named Thomas Godfrey.

Last edit 27 days ago by cw057318
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61 Feb. '77 Rosenthal $35

Livre d' Henres - French (235x160mm) (1515-30) printed on Vellum Paris c. 1515 - [inserted] in French [end inserted] Almanack with Calendar on Veras

p. 273 S.T.C. C. 29 R. 22.

P. Lacombe - Z7838 H6 L2 -2nd page #263 Henres a l'usage de Romevers 1515 sons la marque des Handonin (le centare Nessus) Fol. A2: Almanach pan 1515-1530 imprimés a Paris pan Gillet Handonyn, demonant au bout de pont Nostre Dame, want Sainct Denis de la Chantre, a l'enseigne de la Rollae d'or.

In 4^o Goth. Les grandes figures en couleurs Sur velin. Bibl. Nationale - Velins 1518. --> {does not correspond to this page 5/98 88 feuillets en 11 cahiers signés A-L par 8 30 lignes. Cf. Brunet, Heures, nos 245, 246, et add., col. 1687, n^o 246 bio - Catalogue de la libn. Th. Belin, 1906 n^o 75. Brunet, P.C. - Manuel de librarie, Paris, Vol. 5 p. 1629 Z1011 B89 Ret. or P1638 #251 #245 - Heures a lusaige de Romme Jout au long sens nien nequenin in 4' Goth. - encadnements et grandes planches sur bois - un exemplaire sur Vélin, avec les figures peintes et rehaussées d'or, niche reliure francaise ancienne en manoquin.

P. Lacombo #265 Gillet Handouin In - 4^o Goth, Fig en noir (not velins) A2 A/manach pour 1515-30 10v fenillets en 14 cahiers 28 lines de texte signia A-M per 8 et A par 4 Bibl de l'Ecole des Beaux Arts G.I. 17. #262 - Guillaume Godard - IN 4' Goth. #275 - Simon Vostre - In 4' Goth.

Last edit 27 days ago by cw057318
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Paris, Gillet Hardouyn - large device of the Hardounis viz. Hercules rescuing Deianuce from centaur Hessus. - at border calendar (mine) same as a border from (8 2/8 x 5 1/4) #270 (1509) C. F. Murray --> Z 240 M97 - elaborate borders composed of Renaissance ornament interspersed with children playing, figures of saints, hunting scenes, etc. - boys playing amidst foliage, dance of death - Germain Handouin (son or brother of Gillet) - Les Heures published by Gillet and Germain Hardouin existent en aussi grand nombre que calles de Kenver mais nous les jugeons in [illegible] a as dennieres with surtout a cellus de Vostre - Gillet --> 1497, 1509-1521 (un bout de pon) Notre Dame) aftu 1521 --> Germain. Germain Handouin - Paris worked about 1500-1541. Gillet Hardouin - Paris worked about 1491-1521.

Hind History of Woodcut p 696 A.W. Pollard

- family of Hardouin - taken earliest Horae being used in 1504/5 - printed by Antoine Chappid for Gillet Hurdoim with woodcut surface 7 1/2 x 4 3/4" - Gillet Hardouin - who wiht his successors was responsible for some 70 editions during the first half of the 16th C. Horae - Calendars - of the moveable feasts - all that those calendars show is that the edition in which they occur must have been printed before, probably at least 5 or 6 years before, the last year for which they are reckoned. - the brothers Germain and Gilus Hardouim produced [illegible] as many examples as Vostre and Pigouchet - they are characterized by the frequent use of hand colouring in the woodcuts in imitation of manuscript Book of Ours.

R.L. Poole - Medieval Reckonings of Time London 1921

Last edit 27 days ago by alvoisard
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Book I comprises religion, omens, prodigies Book II social customs Books III-IV virtuous conduct (fortitude, moderation, humanity etc.) Books VII + VIII good fortune, military stratagems, famous law suits, eloquence etc Book IX evil conduct. V. Maximus - the Latin author of a book of historical anecdotes -- was intended for use in schools of rhetoric - the anecdotes are drawn chiefly from Roman history as well as the Greeks. -- Editio Princepa - Strossburg, Johann Mentelin, not after 1470. one of the few classical authors to be first issued by a German press. -- the best existing codex is a ninth Century manuscript of Berne. -- a collection of historical anecdotes intended for the teaching of rhetoric. All that we know of the author's life is that he accompanied Ovid's friend Sextus Pompey to his governorship of Asia about 27AD. Adulation is heaped upon Tiberius throughout, + the violent denunciation of Sejanus in the last book suggests that the work was published soon after Sejanus' fall in 31. The anecdotes for the use of speakers of which the book consists are classified under various moral or philosophical headings (omens, moderation, gratitude, chastity, cruelty + the like) each of these being illustrated from Roman (domestica) + less fully, from foreign (externa) examples. The book's rhetorical artifices, its bombast + its sententiousness illustrate the excesses of the Silver Age. Valerius himself has nothing to say worth hearing. But he knew his market, + his work enjoyed a vogue in antiquity + the Middle Ages. It was twice epitomized, in the 4th + 5th C. Types 113R text type In use in 1490, 1491 78R text _ commentary type. In use 1490, 91, 93 (?) 78GR lower case only. In use 1490, 91. HEHL {no rubrication except 1st letter each book - total of 9 books. (98567) {Prologus {Li. I begins on V my leaf XI b3 ends on XXVIII X misnumbered XI also.

Last edit 2 months ago by elitranscribes
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(57) S.F. Book Fair Charles W. Traylen Sept. '76 $5.00

Tiberius Catius Asconius a Cohaul under Nero. (25 or 26-101)

Silvius Italicus Punica. (Petrus Marsus d. 1512, commentary) Venice: Bonetus Locatellus, for Octavianus Scotus 18 May 1492 f° (c iiii) 1991/$2500 Goff S508 HC 14740 BMC V p 439 Latin cop HEHL, Yale.

156 leaves. 5a:61 lines of commentary surrounding the text, + headline, 242 (249) x 166 mm. Types: 105R; 80R woodcut capitals

The 1st known book of Locotellus is the Augustine of 9 Feb 1486/7 printed for O. Scotus, for whom he continued to work almost exclusively till Scotus's death on Christmas Eve, 1498. Subsequently he worked for the heirs of Scotus + others, + his press was active throughout the 1st decade of the 16th C.

Latin epic poet - author of a long epic entitled Punica - an account in hexameter verse to the 2nd war of the Romans against the Cathaginians (218-201 BC) (War of Hannibal) Punica - the longest epic in Latin literature - comprising 17 books + over 12,000 lines - it deals c the 2nd only of the Punic wars - describes all the 6 great battles of the war - there were 2 editiones principes (1471.)

Octavianus Scotus, a citizen of Monza (near Milan) was an enterprising publisher. It has often been doubted whether he even had a printing office of his own, although his name alone as printer is to be found in a great many books. From 1486 certainly Bonetus Locatellus was his printer, + the books which bear Scotus' name alone are to be ascribed to Locatellus -- Bonetus Locatellus is the printer whose name appears most often in Venetian books towards the end of the 15th C, c a total of 144 editions to his credit. He began printing in 1478 + became the printer to the publishing firm of Ottaviano Scotto.

Last edit 2 months ago by elitranscribes
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