Farfel Notebook 01: Leaves 001-064

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Hans Biatel , Oberdorf str. 17 Zurich 1973 - Music sheet (dinning room) (16C) late 45 SF=$15 8 Parchment - Ca. 1580 - Antiphonal or Choir book for the Daily Office (3) Spain? Italy? (Choir) Quire Book staff of 5 lines texture rotunda. 1973 - Manuscript 14th Century [crossed out] Book of Hours [end crossed out] 19x20cm Augustine Breviary - French Gothic - Latin 75SF = $25 (None) Manuscripts 12x15.5cm 15th C [crossed out] German [end crossed out] Dutch - Gothic Prayer book? 10 11 Similar leaf SF Bookfair 1967 - $175 17x24.5cm Latin- Gothic script Vulgate - 50 - Book of Hours (?Flanders 1425) French (Northern) - Psalm 51 (50) mid 15C - Benedictine (Penitetial) 1974 - Music sheet (hall) Hellmut Schumann AC 12 Mass Ramistrasse 25 Kyrie Elesion Zurich Standard plainchant square notation 120 SF=$40 (Lord, have mercy) Parchment Gradual a choir book containing the music for the Mass 14th C Christe Eleison (Xpi = Christi) -staff of 4 lines (red) (Christ have mercy) (in general use by the end of XII C) Italian Gloria in Exceleis Deo the Gloria - a hymn of praise beginning God in the highest the Gradual or grail contains the variable + fixed parts of the Mass sung by the choir or soloist. 1974 - Gutenberg Bible page DM _ 13 Latin - Black Letter (textura) Pointed Gothic

- Black Letter Text. Stanley Morison. Cambridge Univ. Press 1942.

The Book of Hours made its first appearance in France in the 1st half of the 14th Century. Marginal ornament plays an important part - whether in the form of tendrils + foliage or of a solid frame decorated with animals, flowers, + precious stones. The Book of Hours was usually written in the vernacular rather than Latin. This was a book giving the prayers for laymen at each hour of the day + was commissioned by princes + noblemen. Similar in layout + richness of material was the breviaries made fro bishops + abbots. Psalter - for laymen - private devotion - in the form in which it appears at the beginning of the 13th C was the precursor of the Book of Hours. Psalters of this kind were an English invention.

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Willi Apel - The Notation of Polyphonic Music. 900-1600, 4th rev. ed. (Cambirdge, Mass. 1949)

Kyrie Gloria Credo Santus Benedictus Agnus Dici

an invocation following the Introit of the Mass. If is almost the only part of the liturgy in which the Roman Catholic Church has retained the use of Greek words. Just after the Introit, the priest celebrating the Mass & the servers repeat alternately 3 Times Kyrie Eleison & then as many Times in the same manner Christ Eleison & so on alternately. When it is sung, the leading singer takes the part of the priest & the choir that of the servers. The introduction of the Kyrie into the Mass is attributed to Pope Sylvester I (c. 314-35).

Mass I For Mass preparation: sntiphone Ps 42/43) antiphon. verse response confession verses responses Prayers by celebrant in silence Prayer service: introit: ant. psalm daxology arst. Kyrie elesion Gloria in excelsis greeting invitation prayer of assembly (collecta) acelamation reading service: epistle acclamation intermozzo chants: gradual Alleluia or tract greeting acclamation gospel acclimation creed homily II. Offering greeting invitation to prayer prayers of the faithful acclamations offering offertory response prayers by celebrant in silence

washing of hands Ps. 25/26) invitation to prayer prayer over offerings (secreta) acclamation III. Eucharistic prayer dialogue preface tersanctus prayers anaghoria or canon institution ornamentive prayers final doxology acclamation IV. Eucharistic meal prologue the Lord's prayer prayer (embolism) acclamation breaking of host: Pax domini A acclamation Agnus dei prayer for peace - kiss of peace prayers of preparation in silence communion communion ant. + psalm greeting invitation prayer after a communion (post communio) acclamation greeting dismissal acclamation last gospal

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Voragine (Giacono da Varoggio, known in French as Jacque de) Italian Legiographer, born around 1230 at Voraggio, near Savone, died July 14, 1298 at Genoa. Having entered the Dominican Order in 1254, he impressed everyone by his piety as well as his knowledge, and was in demand to preach the Scriptures in various convents of his order. The purety of his oratory and his knowledge, increased his reputation, and after having held the position of prior for a while, he was elected, in 1267, "provincial" for the whole of Lombardy (one of the largest ecclesiastical provinces of his order), which he administered for no less than 18 years. In 1288 he was pronoted to "définisteur" and Emperor Henry IV entrusted him with the mission to lift the interdiction to which Genoans were subject for having helped the Sicilians who had revolted against the King of Naples, and he participated in the Council of Lucca (1288), and that of Fernare (1290). Promoted in 1292 to the archbishop of Genoa, he held there a synod in which important points of discipline were settled. A loving, compassionate man, pe proved to be entirely devoted to the Holy Sea, and as anxious to bring peace to the church as he was to pacify his own diocase. It is therefore an error to claim, as some winters do that Boniface VIII's virdent quip on Ash Wednesday: "Memento quid gibellines es et cum gibellinis tris in pulverem revertenis" (Remember thou art ghibelline and that with thy ghibellines thou wilt recert to dust) was meant for him. These words may have been apocryphal, but at any rate they could have been addressed only to Voragine's successor at Genoa, Spinola, a ghibelline prelate, whose disagreements with the Holy Sea are a matter of record. Voragine, on the other hand, was able to bring about peace between the "guelfes" + the ghibellines in 1295. However, it was short lived and Voragine had to intervene one day, at the risks of his own life,

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A Chronology of Brinting - C. Clair 655 C38 (Santa Clara) The 1st date book printed in the French language in France was La Légende Dorée, a French translation by Jean de Vignay of Jacobus de Voragine, Légende Aurea, Lyons: Guillaume Le Roy & Barthélemy Buyer, 1476.

between the warring factions. What has brought Voragine's fame to this day is a Life of the Saints that he wrote, which became popular under the name of Légende Dorée (Golden Legend). Composed first in Latin & titled San Legenda Sanctorum in the Historia lombardica manuscripts (too restrictive a title, for it applies almost exclusively to Chapter 176) the work was enthousiastically nicknamed Legenda Aurea by his contemporaries. First distributed as numerous hand written manuscripts, the work was one of the 1st ever to be printed. Editions multiplied till the end of the 15th C., but the oldest extant do not appear to be earlier than 1470. They are undated and the format is in folio. The 1st dated one is from 1475, Paris, in folio, gothic, under the title Aurea Legenda. First translated into French by Jean Belet (hand written only) the legende dorée was than translated by Father Batelier who connected an earlier version of Jean de Vigney (Lyon, 1496 in folio). This translation was utilized by Antoine Verard, Pierre Leber, Marnet etc. in their respective editions. The most recent translation & edition in French is that of Mr. Gustave Brunet (Paris, 1843, 2 vol in 8vo) The 1st English edition was that of Caxton, the printer, under the title Golden Legend (London 1483) Voragine has also authorized Sermons, in Latin, printed in 1484, s.l.n.d. in folio, gothic at Venice 1457 in 4to; a life of Mary titled Marialis, Venice 1497, in 4to and especially a Chronique de la ville de Genoa, which goes as far as 1279, and which was inserted by Muratori in his "Rerum italicanum scriptoris, t. IX.

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The term Vulgate normally means the Latin Bible that has been in common use in the Western Church since the 7th C. It is a collection of translations which differ both in origin + in character. The only justification for calling it Jerome's Vulgate (as we often do) is that there is more of his work in it than there is of anyone else's.

A HISTORY OF PRINTING IN BRITAIN Robert Barker's most important undertaking was the printing of the Bible of 1611, the so-called 'Authorized Version'. There is no extant authority for the phrase, or for the words 'Appointed to be read in Churches' which appear on the title-page, but it is hardly probable that the King's Printer would have made the assertion if it were not true. The text of the 1611 Bible is a great primer blackletter, with chapter headings and marginal references in roman and the alternative readings in italic. There are three issues assigned to the year 1611. The first quarto edition was printed in roman in 1612. The King's Printers in the XVIIth Century We have seen that on the death of Christopher Barker in 1599 his son Robert succeeded to the patent, becoming King's Printer under James I, and he soon came into prominence by printing the Authorized Version of the Bible in 1611. As his father had pointed out in his report of 1582, the printing of the whole Bible calls for the expenditure of a vast sum of money, and to finance the printing of the 1611 Bible Robert Barker received help from three other stationers -- the cousins John and Bonham Norton, and John Bill -- who put up the money in return for sharing in the profits of the patent. John Norton, a bookseller, died the year after the Bible was published. Bonham Norton was a wealthy bookseller and printer described by McKerrow as 'a hard, calculating and grasping man, who was continually in the law courts prosecuting his brother stationers'. 124 John Bill, who had been apprenticed to John Norton, was a well-known bookseller who had been Sir Thomas Bodley's agent in the buying of books for the Bodleian. Robert Barker did not possess his father's business acumen, and in 1617 to raise money he assigned his interest in the patent to Bonham Norton and John Bill. This started litigation, for Barker claimed that the term was for one year, while Norton contended that no reservation had been made. In 1619 Barker's claim was upheld and for a while John Bill and Robert Barker were considered joint holders of the patent. The following year, however, the tenacious Norton managed to win his case, Barker's name disappeared, and Norton's name appeared together with that of Bill. On the accession of Charles I Norton and Bill were confirmed in their appointment as joint King's Printers, and soon afterwards they moved the King's Printing House from Aldersgate to Hunsdon House, Blackfriars. Meanwhile Bonham Norton had been imprisoned on a charge of bribing the Lord Keeper and his share in the patent had once again been awarded to Robert Barker, who died in 1645 after having passed ten years in the King's Bench Prison for debt. John Bill had died in 1630, although his name remained for some time later on the imprint of Bibles, and Bonham Norton died in 1635. Robert Barker's 144

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