Cornelius Ryan WWII papers, box 012, folder 55: Edward F. Wozenski

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D-Day Book 1st Div WOZENSKI, Edward F. Conn 2 [illegible] interview Box 12 #55 Release to PG Co. E 16th Inf 1st wave Easy Green to Easy Red

Lt Duckworth Story

Beach Threatened to shoot LCVP Coxswain if he didn't correct course to come in to right sector

Saw medical troops puring down ramps of LCT directly into mg fire trained on the ramp

"The landing still gives me the horrors. Where was the 2,000 tons of general coverage scheduled by the 8th AF for the beach actually delivered ? What happened to the pinpoint coverage

The only way we got [inserted]out of the water &[end inserted] off the beaches was due to the battle smoke that developed --enough to obscure us to mgrs on the bluffs

Last edit 3 months ago by heatheralr
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For Cornelius Ryan Book about D-Day

THOUSANDS OF MEN,ON LAND AND SEA AND IN THE AIR, PARTICIPATED IN THE INVASION OF NORMANDY BETWEEN MIDNIGHT JUNE 5, 1944 AND MIDNIGHT JUNE 6, 1944. IF YOU WERE ONE OF THEM, PLEASE ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS.

What is your full name? Edward F. Wozenski What was your unit and division? Co"E" 16th Infantry 1st U.S. Infantry Division Where did you arrive in Normandy, and at what time? Omaha Beach- Easy - Red Exit "E-1" - 0630 - 6 June 1944

What was your rank on June 6, 1944? Captain- U.S. Army What was your age on June 6, 1944? 28 years Were you married at that time? Yes What is your wife's name? Regina (Murawski) Wozenski Did you have any children at that time? No

What do you do now? General Foreman- Wallace BArnes Co.-Dir of Associated Spring Corporation- and Regimental Commander 169th Infantry Regiment 43rd Infantry Division- Hardford, Conn. When did you know that you were going to be part of the invasion? After close of action in Sicily and our scheduled return to EnglandWhat was the trip like during the crossing of the Channel? Do you remember, for example, any conversations you had or how you passed the time? Normal feeling of great anxiety- we had detailed knowledge of the formidable physical defenses facing us. There was considerable kidding back and forth of all ranks to ease this fear. spent considerable time in the troop quarters just to ease some mounting fears of being caught below decks in case we ran into mines. Remainder of the time split between word Room-lots of coffee and looking over rest of convoy. What were the rumors on board the boat, ship, or plan in which you made the crossing? (Some people remember scuttlebut to the effect that the Germans had poured gasoline on the wanter and planned to set it afire when the troops came in). Can't recall any outstanding rumors at the moment but I'm sure that a meeting of survivors woukd bring many to light.

Last edit 3 months ago by je562220
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- for Cornelius Ryan 2 - Your name Edward F. Wozenski

Did you by any chance keep a diary of what happened to you that day? No-carried a camera and have some shots that may be of interest. Were any of your friends killed or wounded either during the landing or during the day? Hundreds? Do you remember any conversations you had with them before they became casualties? Yes. I was talking to my Co Ex Ct. Duckworth when he was shot thru the forehead and killed instantly. I threaten to shoot our CCUP coxsworn if he didn't correct his vourse and bring us in to our assigned landing zone. Were you wounded? No. Do you rememvber what it felt like-- that is, do you remember weather you felt any pain or were you so suprised that you felt nothing?

Do you remember seeing or hearing anything that seems funny now, even though it did not, of course, seem amusing at the time? In climing the Bluff I met Sgt Strezynk coming down to pars me on the situation. He stepped on a "teller" mine right in front of my nose- I asked him what in Hell he was doing since we both saw the mine clearly- His answer "Well it didn't go off when I stepped on it while going up the Bluff." Do you recall ny incident, sad or heoic, or simply memorable, which struck you more than anything else? I can recall many incidentsfar more than I can write up here. The tragedt of medical troops pouring down the ramps of LCT's directly into MG fire trained on the ramps. The myystery of the "Duck" Tanks and how (2) came ashore. The sad sight of seeing so many bodies being washed ashore the + there were 2-3 deep in spots- rolling in the waves against the beach.

Last edit 3 months ago by je562220
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- for Cornelius Ryan 3Your name Edward F. Wozenski

In times of great crisis, people generally show either great ingenuity or self-reliance; others do incredibly stupid things. Do you remember any examples of either?

The landing still gives me the horrors and I still would like to know---where was the 2.000 tons of General coverage scheduled for the Beach area by 8th Air Force actually delivered? ---what happened to the pin point coverage of some 186 tons of Bombs for my Target Exit E - 1 by the 9th [?Tach?] Air Force? ---what happend to the 9.000 rockets fired from 9 Landing ship's Rocket? ---why did we land in daylight against our strong recommendations for a night landing? [*The same for Capt Finke on Exit E-2 We were briefed with the pilots who were to do the bombing*]

Where were you at midnight on June 5, 1944? Aboart Attack Transport USS

Where were you at midnight on June 6, 1944? On the perimeter set up by 2d Bn 16th Infantry

Do you know of anybody else who landed within those 24 hours (midnight June 5 to midnight June 6) as infantry, glider or airborne troops, or who took part in the air and sea operations, whom we should write to?

---why did our navy land us approximately 1000 yds East of where we were supposed to land -- with [inserted]relatively[end inserted] clear weather and prominent landmarks at hand? ---why didn't we have smoke coverage when we bogged down on the beaches? In my opinion the only way we got off was due to the battle smoke that developed enough to obsecure us to MGers on the Bluffs. ---what happened to 116th Inf - 29th Inf Div? ---E and F Co's 16th Inf landed alone at 0630 -- from highest waves I could not see signs of any one else just before we hit the beach.

PLEASE LET US HAVE THIS QUESTIONNAIRE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, SO THAT WE CAN INCLUDE YOUR EXPERIENCES IN THE BOOK. WE HOPE THAT YOU WILL CONTINUE YOUR STORY ON SEPARATE SHEETS IF WE HAVE NOT LEFT SUFFICIENT ROOM. FULL ACKNOWLEDGEMENT WILL BE GIVEN IN A CHAPTER CALLED "WHERE THEY ARE NOW; YOUR NAME AND VOCATION OR OCCUPATION WILL BE LISTED.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP.

[*(over)*]

Cornelius Ryan

Frances Ward Research, The Reader's Digest

Last edit 3 months ago by heatheralr
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Initals MD DATE 6 FEB. 45 DECORATIONS AND AWARD BRANCH MILITARY PERSONNEL DIVISION ACO RECORD OF AWARD OF DECORATION BY AGENCY OTHER THAN WAR DEPARTMENT Last Name Wozenski First Name Edward Middle Inital F. Serial Number 0351415 Grade CAPT. Organization 16th INF. Headquarters 1st U.S.A. APO 230 C.O. No. 82 Section III Date 19 Nov. 44 Oak Leaf Clusters DISTINGUISHED-SERVICE CROSS Number 1 Posthumous [crossed out]illegible[end crossed out] NO By Commander LT. GEN. [?HODGES?] Amended Revoked

CITATION

For extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy on 6 June 1944, in [crossed out]illegible[end crossed out]. On D-Day, Captain Wozenski's company suffered numerous casualties in reaching the fire-swept invasion beach. Boldly, he moved along the beach, at the risk of his life, to reorganize his battered troops. The reorganization completed, he courageously led his [?men?] through heavy machine gun and small arms fire across the beach and toward an enemy dominated ridge. Demoralizing fire from a powerful enemy installation on the ridge threatened to stop the attack. Ordering his men to deploy to the flanks of the enemy position, Captain Wozenski, with great valor, advanced alone to within 100 yards of the emplacement. With cool and calm efficiency, he engaged the fortification singlehandedly with rifle fire to divert attention of the enemy from the flanking movement. Upon observing this valiant soldier, the enemy directed the fire of its [crossed out][illegible][end crossed out] machine guns on him but Captain Wozenski, with complete disregard for his own safety, continued his harassing fire until his men reached their positions safely. His inspired troops charged the strongpoint vigorously and completely destroyed it, inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy. By his expert leadership and fearless courage, Captain Wozenski exemplified the highest traditions of the Armed Forces.

Entered military service from [crossed out][illegible][end crossed out] Connecticut.

Last edit 3 months ago by heatheralr
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