Box 024, folder 37: Louis Langell

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LANGELL, Louis

Canadian 3rd Div.

BOX 24, #37

Last edit about 3 years ago by Luigiman85
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For Cornelius Ryan Book about D-Day

THOUSANDS OF MEN, ON LAND AND SEA AND IN THE AIR, PARTICIPATED IN THE INVASION OF NORMANDY BETWEEN MIDNIGHT JUNE 5, 1944, AND MIDNIGHT JUNE 6, 1944. IF YOU WERE ONE OF THEM, PLEASE ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS.

What is your full name? Louis Langell

What was your unit and division?

The Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders 3rd Canadian Division

Where did you arrive in Normandy, and at what time?

On the shores of a town by the name of BERNIERES, at approx 1030 AM, 6 June 1944.

What was vour rank on June 6, 1944?

PRIVATE

What was your age on June 6, 1944?

I was 38 years old.

Were you married at that time?

I was not married.

What was your wife's name?

N/A

Did you have any children at that time?

N/A

What do you do now?

I am still serving in the Canadian Army Regular, stationed at Currie Barracks, Calgary, Alberta, with the QUEEN'S OWN RIFLES of CANADA DEPOT.

When did you know that you were going to be part of the invasion?

The spring of 1944, our training became more rugged, out on manoeuvres every week, long route marches, we did combined operation work, also went to sea in Landing Craft with the Navy doing assualt landing. The last three or four week in England we had our leaves cancelled, we were kept in barracks could not even go to our nearest town to buy cigarette or to one of the PUBS. We were kept under guard at all time so that we could not talk to the civilaian or our friend that came to see us.

What was the trip like during the crossing of the Channel? Do you remember, for example, any conversation you had or how you passed the time?

It was a terribe night for the crossing. The sea was very rough, there w[inserted]as[end of inserted] spray and rain lashing the Landing Craft which was bobbing around like a cork in water, most of us were wet from the sprays that came into the Landing Craft.

The usual conversation was mostly about our homes, our loved ones, our friend that we made in England, but the big question was D-Day. How many of us would be landing safely, so our

Last edit about 3 years ago by SarahAnn
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For Cornelius Ryan - 2 Book about D-Day

Louis Langell

stomacks were feeling heavy, I know mine was. On D-Day every thing turned out all right for our group, we have no casualty on the beach or inland that I can recall.

What were the rumors on board the boat, ship or plane in which you made the crossing? (Some people remember scuttlebut to the effect that the Germans had gasoline on the water and planned to set it afire when the troops came in).

We heard all kinds of rumors concerning gasoline, mines cement casements and pillboxes.

By the time our group arrived on the coast of France, the forward troops had taken command of the beachs, so we had clear sailing. We could see masses of barbed wire, mines that were cleared from the shores were the troops landed, cement casemates and pillboxes used by the emeny for fortification.

Did you by any chance keep a diary of what happened to you that day?

I did not keep a diary.

Were any of your friends killed or wounded either during landing or during the day?

Cannot recall any one being wound or killed on D-Day.

Do you remember any conversations you had with them before they become casualties?

There were no casualties that I can recall in our group on D-Day.

Were you wounded?

I was not wounded on D-Day

Do you remember what it was like, that is, do you remember whether you felt any pain or were so surprised that you felt nothing?

N/A

Do you remember seeing or hearing anything that seem funny now, even though it may not have seemed funny at the time?

YES, one of our Corporal lost his steel helmet, looking around he found a pot with a handle big enough to put on his head, he called out look fellows, how do you like my steel helmet, even though we were being shelled by the emeny, we all turned to see what he was wearing, we could not help but laugh at the sight of him with this pot pulled down nearly over his ears and eyes.

Last edit about 3 years ago by SarahAnn
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For Cornelius Ryan - 3 Book about D-Day

Louis Langell

Do you recall incident, sad or heroic or simply memorable which struck you more than anything else?

NO

In time of great crisis, people generally show either great ingenuity or self-reliance; other do incredibly stupid things Do you remember any example of either from D-Day?

NO

Where were you at midnight on June 5, 1944?

On the shores of England in a landing Craft.

Where were you at midnight on June 6, 1944?

I was crossing the Channel in a Landing Craft to invade the coast of France.

Do you know of anybody else who landed within the 24 hours of D-Day, June 6. as infantry, glider or airborne troops, or who took part in the air and sea operation, whom we should write to?

Major Jack Stoddard Experimental Station LACOMBE, Alberta

Major Jack Stoddard was with the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders, he was Officer Commanding "D" Company

Thanking you

( L Langell) S/Sgt The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada

Last edit about 3 years ago by SarahAnn
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