Articles and Speeches by N. C. Newbold, 1945-1946

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may be termed “glorified” courses in home economics. Perhaps my audience will pardon me if it said that simplified# home economics is a more appropriate term. One of the principal aims and objectives was to be sure every young woman and perhaps every young man who graduated thereafter from that institution would have knowledge, some positive useful and usable knowledge of what constitutes better home living. One hundred to one hundred and fifty teachers were graduated annually from this four-year teachers college. They received the B. S. degree in Education and at the same commencement they also were awarded the State’s “A” certificate for teaching in the public elementary schools. It was not expected that these young persons would teach home economics as such, but it was believed that while they taught young children and engaged in P. T. A. and other meetings with parents the homeliving teaching they received in college would function perhaps in many indifinable ways in the communities where they lived and taught. While the was prevented full development of this program because of difficulty in securing trained teachers, the effort has established a need for this kind and quality of training. It will not be revived, refined and emphasized when competent teachers are available. 2. A Home-Farming Program. This has been a counterpart for your men of the home-living program for girls. Because the college owns a good small farm and it has been possible to secure expert assistance from both Negro and white agricultural colleges of the state, this project has been reasonably successful throughout the war. A capable manager for the farm was secured. Experts from the Agricultural colleges frequently meet groups of Negro farmers from the area of the college and conducted short-period workshops related to successful farming. In various such programs the young men in the college and the farmers in that section of the state secured useful information on farm crops, trucking, raising vegetables and berries, some dairying, raising and caring for stock, poultry raising and the like.

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In this way, the State Teachers College at Elizabeth City proved to be the string right arm of the Agricultural and Technical College in Greensboro 256 miles away. 3. Earning a Living – Teaching I North Carolina now provides income sufficient for a reasonably fair standard of living. Negro and white teachers receive the same salaries for the same training and experience based upon certificates issued by the state. It seemed quite appropriate eight years ago, however, to undertake through a special unit of training in college to fit students for making a respectable living. The aim was to find out about jobs, many kinds of jobs, just plain work. How, when, and where employment of various kinds might be secured. Guidance and some counselling of students was serviceable in this effort. An aircraft station with hundreds of personnel was located near this college. Also Norfolk and Portsmouth Virginia are only fifty miles from Elizabeth City. The United States Navy Yard engaged in building and repairing ships in these cities, and other industrial enterprises near by such as the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, privide jobs at good wages for hundreds and hundreds of men of all races. The unit of training on “Earning a Living” at Teachers College has room to function satisfactorily and usefully. 4. Honesty – The old adage, “Honesty is the best policy” may or may not mean just what it seems to indicate. Common everyday honesty is unmistakable. We always know when we are dealing with an honest person. Perhaps Alexander Pope was right when he wrote, “An honest man’s the noblest work of God.” Can honesty as a principle be taught “out of the books” so to speak, or by “precept and example, “ or by “live upon live” and precept upon precept?” Personal honesty moral and intellectual honesty are sincerely admired qualities when found in persons of all races and conditions of life.

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These four experimental units of instruction and practice at the Teachers College in Elizabeth City, mainly because of the war have not had a fair opportunity to prove their fullest value. The gains however have been very much worthwhile. These units summarized are:

1. A Home Living Program 2. A Home Farming Program 3. Earning a Living 4. Honesty

It is my personal belief, perhaps I should say it even stronger than that, it is a mature conviction that a college, any college, should include in its program of training opportunities for students to gain knowledge and experience in such matters as outined in the discussion of experiments above. It seems that this kind of preparation for teaching should be included in fairly definite form, and not left to chance, knowledge of specific and useful value might or might not ^(emerge) as a by-product of general college programs.

The invitation that came inviting me to attend this conference stated, may I read it again - "What - - the program of education for home and family living should emphasize in the next few years."

In the preceding discussion I have outlined some experiments in teacher education which were tried at State Teachers College, Elizabeth City, North Carolina. For the remainder of the time alloted to me I shall emphasize some ideas which it is hoped will be useful "in the next few years."

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What kind or kinds of training shall teachers Have? In many areas of human knowledge, the teacher will want the same types of education for background, culture, and the like that all educated people desire. In special fields of teaching services such as home economics, the program of studies should no doubt be prepared by specialists in that field,-certainly not by a person engaged in general administration in the public school system. However, even a person of the latter sort may with some degree of temerity offer some suggestions which might help good home economics teachers and perhaps some other teacher groups, t render a wider more effective service to youth wherever they live and work. With that statement as an excuse, if one is needed, I will proceed at once to offer some units of information specifically to be offered (perhaps required) of students who are training to become teachers of home economics: 1. “The Science of Living Among Men.” 1 quarter (three months) The title of this topic is taken from a book, and old book, written perhaps more than forty years ago by one of the really great preachers of America of the last generation. The title of the book is “A Man’s Value to Society.” It was written by Newell Dwight Hillis then preacher of the great Plymouth Church in Brooklyn, New York. The topic suggested for study: “The Science of Living Among Men,” is the title of one of the chapters in Dr. Hillis’s book. Perhaps it is true to say that successful living among people is indeed a science. If so, it can be studied and taught. A considerable body of material on the subject – books, pamphlets, sermons, and the like can be found in college and other libraries. 2. The Family – to be studied in three sections – 1 Quarter (three months) a. Love, courtship and marriage

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b. The family at various stages of life – 25, 30, 40, 50, 60 years, and on. c. Divorce, its cause and effects. Some of us can remember when such a suggestion for study for youth was almost a sacrilege. There was a time, too, in some Southern communities where even the mention of a woman’s club was taboo. Likewise, ambitious keen-minded young girls were afraid to express a desire to attend college. I express the conviction that in the overwhelming majority of American homes there can now be found happy and contented husbands, wives, and children. One the other hand, it is nothing unusual to read in a local newspaper dreary accounts of a dozen or more divorces granted by some court in about as many minutes. It is perhaps appropriate here to refer to the programs of study on marital relations offered at the University of North Carolina by Dr. and Mrs E. R. Groves, It is my understanding that these good teachers were not overwhelmed by large classes when they began their work at Chapel Hill, not were they invited to present their discussions in other colleges at that time. Now, they have full employment for their talents both on and off the university campus. 3. Race Relations in the South – 1 Quarter Perhaps no topic can be mentioned that convey greater significance nor one that is more important for all our 25 or 30 million people in our Southern States. This topic bears close relationship to topic one – “The Science of Living Among Men.” Fortunately, for all our Southern millions there is abundant Literature and other material – books, magazine, pamphlets, etc. on this subject. It is available in every college and university library, and in many schools for both races as well as in churches, city libraries, and private libraries

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