Articles and Speeches by N. C. Newbold, 1944-1945

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MEETING OF THE COMMITTEE ON NEGRO EDUCATION OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

JOINTLY WITH OTHER COMMITTEES ENGAGED IN A STUDY OF NEGRO SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES IN NORTH CAROLINA

HALL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA JULY 6, 1944

The State of North Carolina, apparently, wishes educational opportunities equalized between the races. The fact that the General Assembly for five years has been appropriating for each year approximately $250,000 new money to reduce the salary differential indicates this is true. The action of the Governor and the State Board of Education on June 8, 1944, in arranging to close the gap in the matter of teachers' salaries as of July 1, 1944, is, likewise, an indication of this state-wide purpose.

I. Including elimination of the salary differential, equalization now exists in the following items in the program of public education in our State:

1. The length of the school term - 180 days.

2. Teacher-pupil load in the elementary schools (as of 1940-41) - 32.5 each.

3. Courses of Study - both elementary and high school (Twelve-Year Program).

4. Regulations for accreditment of both elementary and high schools.

5. Program for training and certification of teachers.

6. Salaries of teachers and principals.

7. [begin crossed out] Evaluation of high [end crossed out] schools [begin crossed out] on the list [end crossed out] accredited by the Southern Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges - White 62; Negro 22 (21 [?] Negro high schools have been evaluated. Which is a larger [?] than is true in white high schools.)

Thus, it is true, that in seven phases of the public education program in North Carolina, there exists now the fact of equalization, white and Negro. A careful examination of these seven items will disclose the further fact that they are among the most important in the total educational program.

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It may be wise for our Study Committees to make some investigations to determine:

1. If Negro children are actually attending school 180 days - nine months - and if not, is the failure to attend the full nine months due to the desire of the Negroes themselves or to local official control? (See 1 above.)

2.Does the present organization in local units provide assurance that Negro children will graduate in 1946, or earlier, from the twelfth grade as the fourth year of high school, or continue to graduate from the eleventh grade, as seems to be true in 1944 in some areas? (See 3 above.)

II. Other phases of the educational program in which there is now an approximation, in some cases close approximation, to equality are as follows:

1. Teacher-pupil load in high schools (1940-41) White 24.2 Negro 27.

2. Average daily attendance of average daily membership (1940-41):

a. Elementary Schools White Negro 93.8 90.3

b. High Schools 95.2 93.7

3. Average training of teachers (1942-43) White 790.5 Negro 785.2

4. Graduate and professional training. (Since 1939 and to January, 1944, 1,235 Negroes have registered in graduate courses at the North Carolina College for Negroes, Durham, the Agricultural and Technical College, Greensboro, and in Universities in other states.)

(It appears, therefore, that now, in 1944, according to the tests and measurements ordinarily used to determine educational values, seven points in the total program show equality and four other show some approximation to the ct standard.)

If the statements above are factual, if they present a true picture, then our task today and until this Study is completed is to determine, if we can, what other areas in public education in Negro Schools and Colleges show differences in standards, quality, and services, as between them and similar services for white people in the same areas of education.

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III. Areas or fields in public education in North Carolina in which there are now differences, in some cases wide differences. Some of these areas are:

1. The need for larger and more effective school units -consolidation.

2. Additional and better high schools.

3. An expanded vocational education program.

4. Equipment, general supplies, teaching aids and supplies, and janitorial service (See point 7 in study plan).

5. Jurisdiction of principals.

6. Much larger support for Negro State Colleges in which most of the teachers are trained.

7. Supervision and accreditment of elementary schools (See point 7 in Study plan).

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Obviously, the outline of the topics to be studied, included in the minutes of the State Board Committee as quoted above, forms what may be termed the "Chart and Compass", the guide for us in the Study we are making.

Attention is called to the dates suggested by the Committee for completion of the Studies and submission of reports, together, I presume, with recommendations, on each topic. It is desired by the Committee that all reports, except the one dealing with consolidation, be presented by September 1, 1944, while the one on consolidation is requested by November 1, 1944, if possible.

The consolidation problem is, of course, the most difficult one. It is so large; there are so many areas that will require field study; it involves the outlay of large sums of money; many people must be consulted and agreements reached on numerous phases of the problem; much time and travel will be necessary. While all these statements are facts, the task of working out satisfactory consolidation plans in all the counties desiring them is not an utterly imponderable one. Mr. W. F. Credle, who will have direction of this phase of the Study, has had wide, varied, and successful experience in this field.

Also, while there are still probably more than 1,500 small Negro Schools which should be consolidated, some very substancial progress has already been made in consolidating Negro Schools. This is evidenced by the fact that in 1941-42 698 busses transported 45,583 Negro children to schools, many of which were consolidated schools.

Within the past ten or fifteen years, superintendents and boards of education have requested staff members of the State Department of Education to make initial surveys in their counties for the purpose of consolidating Negro schools. To this date, twenty-nine counties have made such requests and the surveys were made. In some of these counties considerable progress has been made in putting into effect the plans that were proposed.

Last edit 5 months ago by tarobinson
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SR_DPI_DNE_ArticlesSpeeches_Newbold_Box2_1944-1945_05

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Obviously, the outline of the topics to be studied, included in the minutes of the State Board Committee as quoted above, forms what may be termed the "Chart and Compass", the guide for us in the Study we are making.

Attention is called to the dates suggested by the Committee for completion of the Studies and submission of reports, together, I presume, with recommendations, on each topic. It is desired by the Committee that all reports, except the one dealing with consolidation, be presented by September 1, 1944, while the one on consolidation is requested by November 1, 1944, if possible.

The consolidation problem is, of course, the most difficult one. It is so large; there are so many areas that will require field study; it involves the outlay of large sums of money; many people must be consulted and agreements reached on numerous phases of the problem; much time and travel will be necessary. While all these statements are facts, the task of working out satisfactory consolidation plans in all the counties desiring them is not an utterly imponderable one. Mr. W. F. Credle, who will have direction of this phase of the Study, has had wide, varied, and successful experience in this field.

Also, while there are still probably more than 1,500 small Negro Schools which should be consolidated, some very substantial progress has already been made in consolidating Negro Schools. This is evidenced by the fact that in 1941-42 698 busses transported 45,583 Negro children to schools, many of which were consolidated schools.

Arrangements have been made by the State Board Committee to furnish the Study Committees some additional personnel who will work with Mr. Credle, both in the field and in office details, in connection with plans for individual schools. In view of the fact that this program of consolidation is an immune one, it is suggested that superintendents and boards of education who desire the services of our field staff make their requests for such services at some early date.

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