Letter to Thomas T. Sloan from Bridget Sloan, January 7, 1834

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Lexington Jan. 9th 1834

Dear dear boy

I received your welcome letter in due time, and I do most hartely sympathize with you in your sorrow for the death of Fanny. When I stated her death to you, I did not communicate my feelings, because I was convinced that you knew how to apreciate her worth, and therefore can feel her loss. She was dear to me, much more so than I was aware of. I now, see all her perfections in their brightest colours. You ask me my son to pray for the repose of her soul, your wish is granted Oh! how humbly can I kneele, andbow to the Just, and breathe a fervent prayer for her departed spirit. excuse me Theodore for dwelling on this melancholly subject, I feel that it is due to her memory to speake of her some times.

I do grieve to hear you express so much doubt of a future existance. Why will you my child doubt or reject he christian religion, or in this world, and the next. I do intreate you for my sake for your sake and for Gods sake to in-form yourself well upon the truths of religion before you for me any fixed princpals [principles]

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Do you go to church? I should think you had a good opportunity of informing yourself of such articles of faith that you may not be acquainted with. There is nothing that I wish so cincearly as, that it was in my power to lay all the proofs before you that would bury in oblivion every doubt of the doctren of Christ. Is it posible you have the slightest doubt of so holy aDoctren! No, no, I will not believe it. It would render my dying moments wretched. I will tomorrow morning at half past seven kneele before our little alter at the office, and breathe a prayer to God, that he in his mercy may assist you by his grace to see as you should, and do as you should.

Magaretta presented Mr Christy another daughter four weeks since. Mr C. was very much disappointedthat she did not give him a son. It is not named yet. It is a fine healthy child. Can you realize it, that Mag. is the mother of two children. well, well, it is so. She is a devoted mother, and kind wife.

I do not think Mary Jane will ever marry and I think it is best she should not, for I do not think she was born with the dispotion to please or be pleased.

Shortly after I wrote you my last there was a most unhappy circumstance took place at Susan Cooks. Two of her boarders quarled about some fulish thing, and the result was, that one shot the other through the heart, and the poore young man that fell was intierly cleane of given the other any offense whatever he was highly respected by his class mates, as well as all his femail acquintance

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The monster who commited the deed is a dandy in perfection, vain of his person, and a spent thrift in the bargin. He is now in jail, he cannot have his trial un-till march court

16th You see from the different dates that some days has passed since I wrote the above. I was stoped from fineshing this letter by May, she sending for me as she was sick. She is now better. She has at last, named her daughter and it is simpely Mary Lord.

I have just received a letyter from your Aunt JOanna all is well with her, she wishes me to go and spend some time with her this month, but I cannot go, as my health is not good, and I find I must take care of myself. Your grandmother has been sick for the last five weeks. Your Uncle T. will go to Frankfort to morrow or the next day. He has had very bad health all winter. Susan Haggin was married last tuesday. We ware all invited to the wedding but we could not go in consequence of so much indis[position?] [paper torn away] in the family. Well, well what do you [think?] [paper torn away] Robert is without doubt ingaged to be married to E. M. The conclutsion took place this morning. Your brother is the happyest doy you ever saw. He seams to think all is bliss for him the balance of his life. I cannot describe my feelings for the subject. I am pleased, but yet it is a serious reflection Perhaps I will loose his affection as many mothers do if so can I be happy? No, indeed, but I will hope for the best. I have known her long and I think she is per fectly ameable. I saw her yesterday, Mary U and my self called at P_ _ _ _ _ts [lavrn??] to see her and Mrs Ridd

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E. received me very kindly, yes affectionately, but I did not know all then. Robert has just told me all, and he told me to tell you that he would write a long letter soon. he also says you must come next summer and be witness to the finishing stroke.

You must write soon, I feel bad when you do not all send love to you

Your affectionate mother

B. Sloan

Mr. Thomas T. Sloan

Washington

City

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