Memories of Highland Mill Village, by Roger Dale Buchanan

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Sept. 22-2017

By Request,

I am Roger Dale Buchanan. My residence growing up was 287 Young St. Our mail had to be picked up at Highland Station post office, as I grew up in Highland Village. It was a village built by Highland Cotton Mill. I remember Jack Hunsucker and Mr. Young from the mill.

My memory is vague on so much that should have been remembered. Our next door neighbor for 19 years was [Poe?], Pauline, Shay, Lanie and Eddie McDonald. They had a PAWPAW Stone that lived with them. I don't think they liked me calling him PAW PAW because he wasn't my PAW PAW, but that was the only way I knew wat to call him.

Our family consisted of my Dad, Ernest, mom, Madiline, Sister Donese, and brother Gerald. My dad passed away in 1957. I thank the McDonalds, they drove us to see my Dad when he was at Baptist Hospital.

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Highland Village was the most unique village in High Point. There was a community store located across from the mill. All the workers would come in and buy their drinks, goodies and BC Powders. This store had a barber shop, bath, Post Office and butcher shop. Charlie Sizemore and his son Billy owned and operated the store. Dave Jenkins was the butcher.

There was another store on top of the hill on Jordan St. It was owned by the Aldred Brothers, Leon and his brother whose name eludes me. I think they closed the store in the late 50s. I didn't know what happend to them. While in Daytona Bch in 1964, I was in a resturont, they were there, recogonized me and we talked for awhile. At this time they were livin in Daytona.

There yet was another store behind the Aldreds. It was Brogan Grocery owened by John Brogan. I would buy caps for my cap pistol there.

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Most of my family lived and grew up in Highland. The great thing about growing up there, some had it better than others, but everyone was treated as equals.

My Uncle Rowland Buchanan, was telling me about someone stealing his coal one cold night. He jumped out of bed hit that ice cold floor, but decided not to confront the culprit but rather Hollar at them "Hay you thats stealing my coal, leave me enough to start me a fire in the morning."

My Uncle Herman gave us a turkey chick to raise. We called her tweedle. She was a trouble maker. I remember one Fall she stay black and sooty loking. Our neighbor was complaining about the chiminy being stopped up and smoke getting into the house. Going outside and investigating, there was tweedle perched on their chiminy getting warm.

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