Walter Deane papers

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Walter Deane (1848-1930) Papers; Botanical notebook, 1882. Botany Libraries, Archives of the Gray Herbarium,, Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, Mass.

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(seq. 2)

Walter Deane, 29 Brewster St. [Street] Cambridge, Mass. [Massachusetts] My first botanical notes — — 1882 —

Bound March, 1925.

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Title Page (seq. 3)
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Title Page (seq. 3)

W. Deane 29 Brewster St. Apr. 1882

Botanical Notes

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April 1882. Page 1 (seq. 4)
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April 1882. Page 1 (seq. 4)

1882. Apr. 7th Southboro — Mass. I got several specimens of the Symplocarpus foetidus in the hollw back of Mr. Bigelow's which I shall press for the Botanical Gardens — — — — — — — — — Apr. 8th Southboro — Mass. This morning I drove over to Cedar Swamp in Westboo with Rollie Larrabee & George Works. I saw for the first time a swamp of the Cupressus thyroides. The trees seemed to average from 50 to 60 feet in height. I noticed the fibrous shreddy bark and on cutting in to the wood I found it very white.

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April 1882. Page 2 (seq. 5)
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April 1882. Page 2 (seq. 5)

George climbed to the top of a high tree (Cupressus) and cut off about 5 feet of the top from which I have taken specimens were abundant on the branches. The Kalmia latifolia grows in the swamp in abundance and I have put some of the branches with last year's leave to press — I also found the Mitchellia repens with the ripe berries some of which I put to press. This P.M. I successed after working for over an hour with spade and trowel and hands in digging up a Symplocarpus foetidus entire — The rootstock was

about 6 in. long and somewhat over an inch thick and the countless coarse fibrous roots I particularly noticed that the roots near the base of the scape were the youngest and most active, while those at the other end were actually dead. The root stock is ever dying and decaying at one end and advancing at the other — (Gray Lessons in Botany - Page 42). ——————— Apr. 9th Southboro-Mass. I found the Equisetum arvense in a wet sandy ditch by the rail way track near the station. It was only about 2 inches out of the water. This P.M. I found

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April 1882. Page 3 (seq. 6)
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April 1882. Page 3 (seq. 6)

the Hamemelis Virginica on the roadside near George Work's house with last year's pods upon it. It is the first I have seen in Southboro. I also gathered some branches of the Juniperus Virginiana in fruit.

Southboro (I.) Juniperus Virginiana. The specimens in press are all from the same tree which was growing on a dry hillside between Southboro & Cordaville. ——————— Apr. 10th — Southboro — A light fall of snow last night still keeps nature back. This P.M. I gathered ÷ (2) & (3). Staminate catkins

see note ↙ on Aug. 1st of the Populus (grandidentata or tremuloides) from two trees 12 to 15 ft. high growing in sandy ground near the track at the foot of Chestnut Hill. (4) Young fruit of Hamamelus Virginica from a shrub near the top of Chestnut Hill. ——————— Apr. 11th —— Southboro — This morning I took a walk with Rollie and we found the Symplocarpus thicker than I ever saw it. I got two specimens which were remarkably large which I am pressing. ———————

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April 1882. Page 4 (seq. 7)
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April 1882. Page 4 (seq. 7)

Apr. 12th ——— Southboro. I took down to Dr. Gray this morning a box of young seedlings of he Symplocarpus. I did not succeed, while gathering them yesterday, in finding any of this year's sprouts. They were all one, two or three years old yet the seed was firmly attached to the root-stock Dr. Gray told me that the seed could remain on for tht length of time. None of the seeds had more than one plumule, though they sometimes have two or three. I examined a cross section of a seed and found it thus —

[drawing] It is exalbuminous and the main part consists of a fleshy, corn like cotyledon and radicle, with the plumule opposite the hilum — The structure is curious and worth careful study — — — — — — Apr. 13th — — — SouthboroThis morning I went down opposite the cemetary on the Cordaville Road and dug up with a trowel 5 plants of the Symplocarpus. Three of thiem I have expressed to Dr. Gray with some sections of root stock. I cut up one specimen and saw the flower growing in the axil of one of the sheathes or modified leaves [viz?] June 6th

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April 1882. Page 5 (seq. 8)
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April 1882. Page 5 (seq. 8)

which surrounds the flower and leaf stalks. I cut some sections of root stock and also unrolled some of the convolute leaves which are of a very delicate yellow and I shall press them and try to keep their color. This P.M. I went down to the swamp just beyond the cemebary and dug up 60 sprouting seeds of the Symplocarpus, not one of which had more than one plumule, so I imagine they ae not easy to find. I am pressing a number of the young shoots and some sections of the seed. I shall also keep

some whole seeds. I have put in press some Corylus Americana, with male and female flowers which I picked on the cross road between the Bucks and the Marlboro road. ——————— Apr. 14th ——— Southboro - This morning I visited my Equisetum but it is not far enough advanced to gather. I picked some Juniper communis at the foot of Chestnut Hill. The ♂ & ♀ of the Alnus are out and the ♂ catkins of Comptonia asplenifolia are devleoping. I alos saw on a sunny bank some Chelidonium majus quite well advanced. A few warm days will change the face

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April 1882. Page 6 (seq. 9)
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April 1882. Page 6 (seq. 9)

of nature wonderfully. (5) Juniperus communis Foot of Chestnut Hill. ———————— This A.M. I found a Smilax rotundifolia L. high climbing. the first time. I have seen the plant. ———————— Apr. 15th —— Southboro This A.M. took a long walk of about 7 miles. While on my way through a long lane leaving from the Southville road a little below where Hixon's lane runs into it, to Westboro, I found some more Smilax rotundifolia (Greenbrier) just before I got to

the granite post dividing Southboro from Westboro on the lest of the road. ———————— Apr. 21st Cambridge This PM. while walking through Cambridge Common I saw the Capsella bursa-pastoris, (Shepherd's Purse) growing by the trees. ———————— Cambridge Apr. 22nd The white & red maples and the elms are now well in flower though the cold weather still holds everything back. I find from the flowering of the elm just on teh right of the entrance to Mr. McKenzie's church and the one in the corner of the Catholic church grounds corner

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April 1882. Page 7 (seq. 10)
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April 1882. Page 7 (seq. 10)

of Concord Ave and the back entrance to Father's that they are the Ulmus campestris (English Elm) — —————— Cambridge Apr. 23. My birthday. Margie gave me a lovely pocket magnifying glass with a tortoiseshell case. We spend to-day at my cousin Rob Lord's, Newton. The P.M. we took a long drive through Newtonville, Newton Upper Falls, Needham & West Newton. In Newtonville I dug up some Sanguinaria canadensis. At Needham I dug up a number of the Hepatica troloba, the first time I have ever seen them growing.

They were on a rather dry hillside, the flowers were peeping up through the dry leaves which covered the ground. This A.M. I cut some specimens of the Acer rubrum & Ulmus Americana in flower, in Newton in Rob's house. All these specimens I am pressing. I shall go to Rob's when the leaves are out to verify the Acer & Ulmus ———— ——————— Cambridge Apr. 27 — A snow-storm still reminds one of winter. The buds are struggling to unfold themselves, but make poor work of it. Nature seems to be yawning after her long sleep and trying hard to wake up.

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April 1882. Page 8 (seq. 11)
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April 1882. Page 8 (seq. 11)

Apr. 29 — CambridgeI got hope this P.M. in time to spend an hour at the Bot. Gard. [Botanical Garden]. I haven't been there for nearly two weeks. Found Mr. Watson alone and had a pleasant conversation with him for nearly an hour. He told me that the specific name of was Cornus mas, is a Pre-Lineaen name and means masculine, though its application is unknown. ———————— Apr. 30 ————— Cambridge This A.M. I went up to Mother's and got a specimen of Capsella bursa-pastoris on the south slope which I am pressing. This PM

Rollie and I drove to Waverly and I secured the following specimens which are in press. Lindera benzoin. This is growing very freely near the Oaks, between the road and the brook. Equisetum hyemale — (Scouring Rush). Near the brook near the Oaks, growing freely. Chrysosplenium americanum near the brook. Sanguinaria canadensis — Juniperus virginiana — Symplocarpus foetidus. Acer rubrum — Near the stone wall where the dog tooth violets grow — ——————————

Last edit almost 2 years ago by Judy Warnement
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