Susan B. Anthony Papers, 1815-1961. Diaries. 1853-1856, with scattered later entries, most n.d. A-143, folder 8. Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

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20 Went to the Capitol, heard short speeches from Senators Butler of D.C. & Mason of Va. Butler the grossest most beastly kind of looking man.

[5] [Washington D. C.]

1854

March 21

Called on Mrs. Melvin a friend of Mrs. Rose, a member of the M.E. Church South, we talked on the Slavery question, she called the relation between Master & slave, a Patriarchial one, said Slavery is a humane institution. My blood chilled in my veins at the thought of a professed Christian, thus so entirely losing sight of the great principle of love, the Golden Rule _

Called at Gerritt Smith's about two o'clock, Mrs. Smith alone, had a very pleasant chat with her, on the right of every individual to his own belief.

To day the Nebraska Bill in the House was referred to the Com. on the whole by a vote of 110 to 65 thought to be virtually death to the Bill.

Miss Miner of the Colorado Girls School called on us after dinner a very interesing enthusiastic nature, expressed herself interested in the Women's Rights question,

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[Washington - 154]

March 21

Mrs. Rose spoke in Carver's Saloon to a small audience, not exceeding 100, 40 tickets only were sold, thus, $10 was the amount of receipts _

The smallness of the audience was attributable to the fact that the subject has never ["X" in left-hand margin] been agitated here, Lucy Stone spoke last January to a small audience, had a rainy night. Mrs. R's subject the Educational & Social Rights of Woman.

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Rainy & snowy this A.M. Mr. & Mrs. Davis left the St Charles - went to Carver's Saloon but Mrs. R. adjourned the meeting until Friday the 24th Called in Mrs Thompson's room, had a pleasant chat, then returned to our room & prepared notices for the Several Papers for Friday eve ning meeting. In the A. M. called on M. Thompson a young Lawyer from South Carolina to get Law Books, he looked surprised that a woman should desire to look over the musty Law Books -

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March 23d

Cloudy in the A. M. bright about noon, showers in the P.M. & a wind & rain storm in the [fore?] part of evening & clear at 9 o'clock. Visited the printing offices, The Evening Star, the only paper that has charged us for insertion of notices & the only one that reported Mrs. R's speech Most of the Editors seem kind & polite, willing to publish all the articles I gave them - at 1 o'clock went to the Capitol listened to three speeches from Southern [men?] - Millison of Va., Hunt of La. & Breckenridge of Kentucky

The 1st in favor of the original Nebraska Bill, but opposed to the Badger amendment, the 2d opposed to the Bill, out & out, on the ground that it is a violation of Good Faith, as plighted in the Missouri Compromise. The 3d in favor of the Bill, an eloquent speaker, & had he had truth for his founda tion principle, his speech would have been a most powerful one, his face had a fine expression,

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[154]

how hateful is slavery, that it prostrates such nobilites of land to so base ends. Mrs. R. & Myself dined at Gerritt Smith's Dr. James & wife of Syracuse & Mr. Hagaty & wife of Lockport were also there - Mrs. Smith's sister Tallman of Rochester & brother Fitzugh were there - passed the evening very pleasantly.

March 24

Directed tickets to Mrs Rose meeting on Political & Legal Rights of woman this evening at Carver's Saloon, to both Representatives & Senators, in all about 300 in number

Asked the Speaker of the House for the use of the Capitol on Sunday A. M. ["X" in the left margin] he referred me to Mr. Milburn the Chaplain, _ called on him he could not allow her to speak there because she was ["X" in the left margin] not a member of some religious society - I remarked to him that ours was a country professing Religious as well as Civil Liberty & for me not to allow any & every faith to be declared in the Capitol of the

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nation, made the profession to religious freedom a perfect mockery. Though acknowledged the truthfulness of my positin he could not allow a per son who failed to recognize the Divine, to speak in his place.

Mrs. Rose gave her lecture on the Political & Legal Rights of ["X" in the left margin] Woman this evening, a better audience than on Tuesday eve.

[76?] W. G. present, looked over our account of Receits & Expenditures, from the time of leaving my Albany March 14th & found that the former were ["X" in the left margin] $22.75 & the latter $114.46 notwithstanding this pecuniary loss, we can but feel that [good] has been done. The Washington people seem to gratify their love for speech hearing by attendance at the Capitol. Very few persons can draw an audience of respectable size here - The Editors here are very Polite, unlike our North ern ones, they publish notices gratis, & unlike them, they are cautious

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March 154

about committing themselves on the question. All of them have spoken well of Mrs. R.'s talents, but not one, even ["X" in the left margin] the National Era, has said a word either, for or against the Cause - The Daily Evening Star is the only paper that has charged for publishing notices & the only that has reported Mrs R's speech - it gave a fine report, but not a comment -

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Cold & Windy, Cloak & Furs are quite necessary.

Mrs. R. & Self called on Lynn Bogard of Ken. Speaker of the House, to ask him if it were probable that the Capitol Hall could be obtained for Mrs. R. to speak in. he said there was a standing to allow no one to speak there on any any subject.

Left W. in stage for Alexandria about 11 Oclock secured there Liberty Hall got Bills printed, or spoke

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for them, engaged a man to post them & returned to W at 2 1/2 Oclock, by boat - The wind blew very high. The Potomac is a beautiful broad river, much larger than the Hudson.

["X" in the left margin] Arrived at the St. Charles, just in time for dinner, after which we made a second call on Mr. Millburn. Mrs. R. thought she could influence him to allow her the Hall for the afternoon, but he assumed great clerical sanctimony & said No __

Mrs. Davis called in evening we went into the Parlor, & all hands, save me, joined in the dances. Tired & weary I slipped out at an early hour & laid my head upon my pillow.

March 26 - Went to the Capitol & listened to Mr. Milburn on Home Life ["X" in the left margin] he said many good things & many thngs that indicated gross ignorance, misrepresentation - said, ?? was

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[March 154]

"It is here in the home that most men & all women's chiefest duties lie."

After dinner called on Mrs. Pendleton, who said she call in her Carriage (the one made expressly for President Pierce) & take us ["X" in the left margin] to the President's, on Tuesday A.M.

Called also at Gerrit Smith's & spent the evening had a delightful conversation. Mrs. Smith is a most splendid woman, plays beautifully on the Piano & sings most sweetly. I was charmed with her, Several gents came in, Dr. Brittain of N. York among them, a circle was formed, & Mrs. Smith sang & played to [woo?] the spirits - but all in vain - nothing wonderful manifested.

Mrs. Smith said he wished to share with us in the pecuniary loss of our meeting & insisted on my accepting a Bill which I afterward learned to

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[March 154]

["X" in the left margin} be a $20, Bank note, Expressed himself very glad that Mrs. R. had come to Washington. Gov. Talmadge of Wisconsin accompanied us to the St. Charles _ The wind has blown very hard all day, & the air been very cold, ice was found quite thick in the A. M.

March, 27.

Weather moderated but still cold, After walking about two miles, visiting fine printing office the Bill Printer, & Bill Poster, I returned & with Mrs. R. visited the Patent Office, the most ["X" in the left margin] remarkable curiosities there were the Sword, Cane, the Coat, vest, breeches of Gen. Washington worn at the time he resigned his Commission, his Camp Chest - with its appurtenances - Tea Pot, Coffee Urn, Pepper dish, Salt _ tea chest, Grid Iron, tin kettles for cooking [tea?], also the writing desk used by him during all his Campaigns - there too was a bit of the old tent cloth - ragged & dirty

Last edit 4 months ago by madeleinemurphy6
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