Maud Wood Park Papers (Woman's Rights Collection). Personal and Biographical. "Journal for the year 1880.". WRC-Pa, folder Pa-1. Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

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(seq. 21)
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[the following is written in pencil in the margins of a previously used copy book inscribed in ink in Spencerian copperplate; original writing is below.] that should be pure & shiny & real. At the same time she felt that this was ungrateful to her husband who had given her this opportunity to acquire nearly all that she knew & her life was a continual struggle between the things that she liked & thought best [word illegible] & the things that she despised but thought right for one in her position. She tried to hide this from her husband but he realized there was something between them though he could not have told what & he consoled himself by a little pleasure not really wrong but extremeley distasteful to his wife. May knew that Mrs. Merriam was unhappy & thougguessed the had an reason why idea of the reason though not clearly defined. [cyrd?] to he a than was much pity & respect mingled with her love for her friend. For May Mrs Merriam recognized a character & qualities very like her own & she had an almost motherly feeling for the girl & a desire that she might not waste her [Original ink writing:}

The Child's Hymn

We are poor and lowly born WIth the poor we bide; Labor is our heritage Care and want beside.

What of this> -- ouyr blessed lord Was of lowly birth, And poor toiling fishermen Were His freinds on earth.

We are ignorant and young Simple children all; Gifted with but humble powers, And of learning small.

What of this? -- our blessed Lord, Loved such as we; How he the little ones Setting on his knee!

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opportunities or made mistakes as she had made mistakes there was an understanding & an affection between them that was very pleasant they had the same [kinds?] & likes & liked the same pursuits & Mrs Merriam's house was a second home to May. That afternoon May helped Mrs Merriam attend to the little matters that had to be arranged for the evening the drawing up of the prizes & favours arranging sorting flowers & later setting out the silver & china, Afterward they planned to have the last part for their reading & after they had given an hour or two to the English essayists whom they were studying they fell to discussing the expected guests. They were speaking of rich girl & May told Mrs Merriam how hard it had been for her to understand --- - lately. You know we used to be great friends she said but now Mabel is so strange sometimes she acts as though she were very fond of me & then she will hardly speak at all. I don't can't explain understand it at all. There is something the matter with Mabel said Mrs Merriam she isn't happy you could see that by her face she is one of those people who need somebody to love & care for & she can't get interested in things aside from people. The world to her means the men & women who live in it & nothing more. And as for [Jim?] Mrs Merriam went on he is getting vastly more sociable since he came home. Young Saunders had come to left college 2 months before & had gone into his father's mills. May

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flushed a little. Saunders had contrived to be near her quite frequently since the night he had made his odd remark & though his conversation was apt to flag & was always

It is very curious to watch the wood piercers at their work. In the spring they look about for dead or rotten wood in which to make a house for their young ones. When the female has found an old wooden post that will do, she bores into it for about half an inch, and then changes the direction, making a hollow half an inch in diameter, which runs parallel with the sides of the post and is about twelve or fifteen inches long. She works very hard and has no help from the male. If you should look about a foot from the post you should see on the ground little heaps of saw-dust almost as coarse as if it had been made by a hand-saw. The only tools that this little insect has to work with are her strong jaws. She divides this hole into ten rooms each about one inch deep and roof of one makes the floor of another. This floor is made from wood-dust mixed with glue from the animals body. Before the cell is closed it is filled with honey an egg is also placed in each cell.

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(seq. 24)
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on the most impersonal subjects. May was greatly puzzled to know just how he felt towards her. Mrs Merriam who had

When the young bee is first hatched it has hardly room enough to turn in the cell but as it eats the paste the space becomes larger so that the bee has room in which to grow. In a row of cells the worms are of different ages and of course of sizes. Those in the lower cells are older than those in the upper, because after the first cell is done it is a long time before the last one is finished. The worms that are in the upper cells are hatched last. Of course the young in the lowest cell must come out at the bottom of the hollow in the post. If he should try to work upwards he would disturb the rest. Therefore the egg is so placed that the head of the worm will always point downwards. The mother-bee digs a hole at the bottom of the long tube which leads from the lowest cell to the open air. Sometimes she makes another near the middle of the tube. The bees find through this passage an easy way out. They always work their way downward by piercing the floor of their cells which they can do [such?]

Last edit over 2 years ago by MelanieEvans
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keen eyes & who suspected that Saunders was fond of May waited hoping that the girl would give her her confidence if there were any to give. But May said nothing & it was soon indeed there time for thisin the first place it seemed to her indelicate to talk about attentions which were so ambiguous & in the next place she didn't know how she regarded him. She wanted to marry a rich man if she married at all she had good reason to know what misery can be caused by lack of money & she sometimes felt that the only way in which she could give substantial proof of her fondness for her father would be by giving him a rich son-in-law. But it seemed dreadful to be thinking at all in that way of a man who had never asked her to be his wife she felt that 125672 it was setting her cap a thing she disliked both in expression 25672 & reality. The only thing to do was not to think about Saunders 5672 at all & this she tried to accomplish. The evening was a pleasant [?] as they always were at Mrs. Merriam's. There was plenty of time for tete a tete & yet there was not enough of it to be stupid. Ned on coming in looked around as usual for May but when he saw that she was supplied with a cavalier in the person of [Jim?] Saunders he thought he would not go near her just then. Over in the corner was Mabel Saunders folding & unfolding a large fan & trying to look interested in something that Harry Phillips was telling to her & Violet Wilson. Mabel looked unusually pretty that night. She wore a gown of a neutral cloth blue over a white the flat [collar?]

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