Maud Wood Park Papers (Woman's Rights Collection). Personal and Biographical. "Journal for the year 1880.". WRC-Pa, folder Pa-1. Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

ReadAboutContentsHelp


Pages

(seq. 6)
Needs Review

(seq. 6)

Adverbs describe actins and qualities well badly how when where here there fast slowly how then ever lately always early often seldom daily yesterday to-day to-morrow very

May wanted to laugh when she thought of Tom's speech & she had a little feeling of grateful pride too for Tom was the great embodiment of great expectations to many of her acquaintances. Violet Wilsons particularly & being too lazy or too indifferent to visit her [?] he honorably paid a half hearted sort of attention of which she was very vain, May had told herself though he make himself of thisthat what Tom had said was quite as likely to mean very little as very much & with a little effort succeeded in putting it almost out of her mind. That winter was remembered as the gayest [Halberton?] had had. To be sure the excitement was all in a small way but there were many little card parties, skating parties, two sets of theatricals & a series of dancing parties along in the spring. It followed when one person entertained that another felt that she must do likewise, the young people were meeting each other continually & as they were not many in number

Last edit over 2 years ago by vant
(seq. 7)
Needs Review

(seq. 7)

since been ever left out, At the end of a month or two Harry felt well acquainted with them all but especially with May & a few of his [?] particular, He went a good deal to the Stone's at first with Ned & then by himself. Their mutual enthusiasm over books made common ground between them & led to many discussions in which Harry came to know May [&?] her opinions better than many of her old friends, He [soon?] drew the inference that she was not happy though thanks to the prevalent idea with regard to her father's business affairs he did not suspect the real reason [Matthew?] [?] [?] Mrs Stone liked Harry but they did not think of interfering. Mr Stone was absorbed in business & yielding to a belief in fate which he would have laughed at eight or ten years before did not allow himself to think of the crash which would come sooner or later unless something unexpected happened to prevent it, the anxiety & fret told seriously on Mrs Stone's nerves & temper She was a woman of good impulses but she was quick temprd & fault-finding She never made up her mind to make anybody unhappy indeed she intended to [doubt?] [as] best she knew as she said but she was egotistical & quick to take offence & added to this she never stopped to reason about any thing. She had the impression that May had somehow infringed on her place in her husband's affections & she cherished this spark of

Interjections express sudden feeling. O! oh! ah! alas! lo! hurrah!

Last edit over 2 years ago by MelanieEvans
(seq. 8)
Needs Review

(seq. 8)

A Preposition is a a word used to show the relation between a following noun or pronoun and some other word.

supposed wrong letting it blaze forth now & then where any real or fancied provocation set it going. She would have laughed at the idea that her mother's fondness for May had really all faded away but it was [true?] May had [?] [grown?] her [gone?] beyond her & she resented the fact. She showed her feeling by a continual fault-finding & [taunting?] which May would have found unbearable if she had not been too much occupied with her father's unhappiness to think much about it. [To?] be sure Mrs. Stone had much right on her side. May was given to sitting down and [mourning?] over her griefs rather instead of giving her time to her daily duties or makng much effort to find a way out of her troubles. She was not practical & that was a trial to her practical mother & Mrs. Stone thought May ought not to complain of having a hard life when she had always had plenty to eat & to wear. You didn't have look out to see where your bread & butter's coming from she would say to her daughter & I don't know why you should go around looking as though you'd lost your last friend, the misunderstanding & lack of appreciation between May & her mother was unfortunate for both of them it embittered their lives & added an unnecessary

Last edit over 2 years ago by MelanieEvans
(seq. 9)
Needs Review

(seq. 9)

grief to their inevitable sorrows. Sometimes May understood this & one afternoon she made up her mind to go to her friend Mrs Merriam and ask her what she should do to make herself a pleasanter companion. /the two had been fond of each other ever since Mrs Merriam had come to H[alberston?] years before & her friends pretty home had been May's refuge & resting-place from many of her daily frets. She had for Mrs Merriam that feeling of reverence admiration of respectful love that nearly most girls havefor an older woman sometimes & that corresponds to her hero-worship of their brothers. It was quite late when she started this afternoon & she hurried along thinking of anything rather than the steps she was taking the ground has crossed with sun & as she went was a crossing a few steps [just?] [?] Mrs [Merriam's?] a sleigh being driven rapidly by 1 of her men came down the road May had on a hood &so did not hear the sleigh bells & only looked up when one of the men shouted She turned quickly to go back slipped & fell in the [crossing?] the man attempted to pull back his horse but it was going at a good gait & he was so close to her by that time that it was impossible to stop. She must inevitably have been over if a man who had been a little distance behind her had not leaped to her side & dragged her a little out of the way [so?] very little that the runners of the sleigh passed over one of the floating ends of the scarf she had about her head the men who were driving stopped long enough to see that no harm

Last edit over 2 years ago by MelanieEvans
(seq. 10)
Needs Review

(seq. 10)

had been done & then went over & May who had not lost consciousness but who seemed for a minute to be a sort of trance without power to move looked up at her rescuer. It was Harry Phillips My God Miss Stone you aren't hurt he said when he saw her face. You aren't hurt he said breathlessly the sound of his voice brought back her power of action. She shook her head & then attempted to rise. For a moment the sense of her deserted her & she realized [only?] the absurdity of the position. To Harry's great surprise she began to laugh. He helped her up & noticing how she was [breathing?] ask if he might not walk with her as far as she was going. Don't be afraid of [I shouldn't have hysterics?] or do anything absurd and only going [?] a step as far as Mrs Merriam's she replied but I wish you would come in with me for perhaps then I shall be able to thank you properly for saving my life. Neither spoke until they reached the house there was so much to say that they both felt unable to begin. May walked a little awkwardly & was very white They found Mrs Merriam in her [?] parlor, May felt that she must explain how Harry happened to have come so she tried to make as light of it as possible. I have had the most exciting adventure she began & then the full sense of the death she had escaped broke upon & She Her laugh changed to crying & she was [?] to give in to an attack of the very hysterics she had thought of with scorn. Why May my dear child whatever is the matter asked Mrs. Merriam astonished at this inexplicable conduct. May tried to talk but only sobbed the harder & Mrs. Merriam in despair turned to Harry for an explanation. He too

Last edit over 2 years ago by MelanieEvans
Displaying pages 6 - 10 of 44 in total