Poor Family Papers, 1791-1921. John and Lucy (Tappan) Pierce. John Pierce to Abiel Aboot, 1794-1817. A-132, folder 3, Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

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Brookline, 1 January, 1817.

Rev. and Dear Sir,

I now make a direct application to your daughter Adeline to instruct our young misses, this season; and I will thank you to propose it to her with your best advice, and return an answer, as soon as it can be decided.

We have already ascertained, that 20 in this town will be desirous of entering the Academy, if she will undertake its instruction. Probbly more will offer themselves. Those, I have mentioned, are exclusive of our Bostonians. Mr. Samuel Hammond, who comes out in April, yesterday told me, that he should wish to send two; and Mr. Thomas W. Sumner, who expects to spend the summer with us, has two more. Mr. Thomas Perkins will unquestionably desire to send one. A woman in Roxbury told me, the other evening, that 4 or 5 would offer themselves from her neighborhood. Indeed there is in my mind no doubt, that

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your daughter might have as large and respectable a school as she could wish.

The term of our people would calculate to be the same with Miss Stebbins's. For four or five of the youngest, who attended to nothing more, than reading and spelling, she charged but 2 shillings, a week, apiece. The others paid half a dollar, a week.

The branches of instruction are such, as are usually taught at Academies.

As to board, as we have four daughters at least, whom we shall wish her to instruct, we would endeavour to accomodate her in our family, in the same manner, and on the same terms, as we did Miss Stebbins, which we will explain, on seeing you or your daughter.

The deduction to be made from this compensation is one dollar, a week, for the room, and a small indefinite sum, at the beginning and end of the season, for wood.

The time for commencing the school, is the first monday in May, to be continued till about Thanksgiving time. Miss S. sometimes kept through the winter. But this is not so

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profitable to the preceptress, as the summer.

Your daughter will find in our little village society of sterling worth, particularly some young ladies, who will be kindred souls. Our people are highly desirous of welcoming her to their small, but happy circle. We shall do every thing to our power to make her time pass pleasantly; and we sincerely hope, that [...]thing will prevent her from complying with our wishes.

I recieved your kind letter, the day after its arrival in Boston. I must apologize for the carelessness of this letter, so much after the manner of my common conversation, rapid and incorrect. I am preparing for a journey+ to Burlington, Vermont, to assist in dedicating a house of worship; from which place I contemplate a journey to Montreal in Canada, unless I should meet with obstacles, so perplexing to Gen. Dearborn, in a like expedition. I hope to return before the 1 Feb. In the mean time, accept for yourself and wife and children the felicitations of the season, which are cordinally presented by Mrs. P. and your friend & brother, Rev. Mr. Abbott. John Pierce.

+ to start next monday.

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Note. Brookline, 1 Jan. 1817.

6 { Stamp} { Stamp} Paid. 6

Rev. Abiel Abbot, Beverly.

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No. 21. Beverly, 22 November, 1818. Saturday night, 10½.

My dear brother,

Here I am safely by your fireside, Emily writing at the opposite side of the table. I arrived here, just before sunset, last evening. This day, I have attempted to preach to your people. The house was well filled with attentive hearers. Your good Mr. Moses Brown, who was unable to attend publick worship, invited me to dine. I was sorry to find him so indisposed. His son was there. We remembered you affectionately at the throne of grace, both parts of the day. Your letter had been received, the day before; and I was pleased to witness the interest, which was manifested by the great numbers. After service, I took tea with Mr & Mrs Dane. They spoke of you with great affection. I enjoyed myself highly around their social fireside, till Emily came to annouce, that Mr. Flagg & c. had come to sing. Immediately, I repaired to your house, and we had some pleasant musick, till past nine o'clock.

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I forgot to mention, that immediately after the afternoon service, I called with Mr. D. to visit Mrs. Woodbury, who is apparently on the borders of eternity. She conversed with great propriety on leaving the world. A humble hope has caused her to triumph over the fear of death. She spoke with a smile of complacency on the subject of leaving her husband, her children, & all she holds dear on this side of eternity. I think, she will continue here but a few days. There was no note, this day, for sickness. Three were offered by persons returned from sea. I desired the Church to remain to recieve a letter inviting them to the installation of Mr. Lerley.

Last wednesday & thursday I had a tedious session in a Council at Dedham. Seventeen Churches were invited by the Church in Dedham to impart advice, as to the conduct they ought to pursue. It appears, that Mr. Lamson, a Cambridge graduate of 1814, was ordained, the very day you sailed, over the first parish in Dedham, to the exclusion of the Church. In giving the call, there were 15 of the Chh for Mr. L. & 17 against him. He could not therefore be ordained over a body, the majority of which was opposed to him. According to the Council,

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consisting of 15 Chhs, among the pastors of which were Messrs Channing & Lowell, unanimously voted to ordain him minister of the parish, & not of the Chh. The lawsof the State, it is said, will countenance the measure, though perfectly novel in our ecclesiastical annals. Our council were much perplexed by what advice to give to the Chh. Attempts were made by several of us to recommend to them the hearing of Mr. L. with a view on recoucilation. But all, which could be obtained was advice to worship wherever conscience should dictate. Deac. Swan, your brother Wales's butcher, was so affected by the unhappy divisions in his Chh, that he became delirious, & died last week on friday. I cannot but wonder, that Mr. L. should consent to settle under such peculiar circumstances.

At our last Assocation we approbated Mr. Pierpont, the celebrated American poet and a Mr. Francis of Medford. The latter young gentleman would, I think, make a promising candidate at Charleston, should there be occasion for one in Mr. F's parish. Since you left us, there has been a grand rebellion in the Soph. class at College. Eleven were publickly censured, & the whole of them sent away. But they now have liberty to return, on a written application, & the promise of obedience to the laws. I shall hope for a good long letter in your usual style to your affectionate J. P.

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